Perception and Uptake of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test among Caregivers of Under-Five in Owerri West Local Government Area of Imo State, Nigeria

Abstract

The launch of RDT is hoped to enable in reducing the rate of presumptive treatment of malaria. However, simply making RDTs available has not led to high uptake of the test, in light of this, it is crucial to understand the perception of RDT and its uptake among caregivers concerning the treatment of malaria in under five children, therefore the aim of the study was to determine the perception and uptake of rapid diagnostic test in the treatment of malaria among care givers of under five children in Owerri West Local Government. Descriptive study was employed and a multi stage cluster and systematic sampling techniques was used to select 420 respondents in the LGA. The Instrument for data collection was structured pre- tested questionnaire which was administered by trained researcher after gaining informed consent from the respondents. Results of the study showed that more respondents were aged 30 -49 years 161 (38.3%), females 268 (63.8%), Married 216 (51.4%), Primary education 126 (63.8%) and civil servant was 196 (46%) respectively. Perception of malaria RDT showed that 175 (41.7%) respondents were of the opinion that mRDT was useful, 102 (24.3%) not useful, 101 (24%) dangerous while 16 (2.8%) felt it was not good. Malaria RDT uptake indicated that majority of the respondents 223 (53.1%) did not know about RDT and 215 (51.2%) did not carry out mRDT test. 300 (73.8%) indicated that malaria rapid diagnostic test is not very useful and 373 (88.8%) of caregivers were of the opinion that mRDTs w ere expensive. From the study it is evident that the perception of malaria rapid diagnostic is negative and low, therefore sensitization of the caregivers about mRDTs will be of benefit.

Keywords: Imo State, Malaria, Nigeria, Perception, Uptake, under five

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 11-26 (Download PDF)

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