Investigating the link between Self-Concept and Job Performance of Agricultural Science Teachers in selected Secondary Schools in Namibia’s Zambezi Region

Abstract

A teacher’s job performance is impacted by diverse components including, among others, the individual self-concept in teaching a particular school subject. The teacher’s self-concept is the perception or belief that he/she has about his/her psychological well-being and occupational satisfaction. The study investigated the job performance self-concept of Agricultural Science teachers in selected secondary schools in Zambezi Region of Namibia. A qualitative research design involving an individual face-to-face interview was used to collect data on teachers’ job performance self-concept from a sample of 12 participants. The study used purposive sampling to select the 12 participants made up of 6 male and 6 female Agricultural science teachers currently teaching in the study area. The results of the study revealed that the majority of the participants were proficient in both theory and practical skills, while a handful further indicated that they could identify the needs of the syllabus and that of the learners. These components were considered essential in nurturing learners’ achievement in Agricultural Science. The study further revealed that gender plays no significant role concerning teacher’s competencies in teaching Agricultural Science in the Zambezi region. However, it was found that the participants who had more years of Agricultural Science teaching experience were better equipped with subject content knowledge than their less experienced counterparts. 

Keywords: Agricultural Science, Competencies, Experience, Gender, Job Performance, Self-Concept

DOI: https://doi.org/10.37745/ijeld.2013/vol10n5pp3343

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 33-43 (Download PDF)

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