STUDY OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SOLUTIONS USED AS PRESERVATIVES IN DENTAL AVULSION: AN ANALYSIS IN VITRO

Abstract

In case of dental avulsion the recommended treatment avulsion is an immediate replantation. Yet when this is not possible, the tooth must be placed in a storage media capable of maintaining the viability of the cells of the periodontal ligament and restores their physiology, what is extremely important for a favorable prognosis. The ideal storage media should be readily available at the time of the accident; it must have an adequate ph and osmolality and should still be able to maintain the vitality and the proper functioning of the cell with minimal toxicity and be able to avoid the presence and proliferation of microorganisms. Hank’s balanced salt solution (HBSS) and milk have gained wide acceptance as storage media for avulsed tooth. However, the effect of the media and storage time on the periodontal ligament (PDL) cells involvement in the development of root resorption is still unclear. Among the various medias that have been successfully used, we may find HBSS, milk and propolis. This study aims to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the cytotoxic effects of storage medias, including propolis, coconut water, coconut milk, HBSS, saline with antibiotics and milk, used in cases of tooth avulsion through the microscopic observation of the cellular changes occurred in macrophages. In this study, the exposure of the macrophages to the storage medias used in dental avulsion, allowed the evaluation, through optical microscope, of the cytotoxicity based on the apoptotic behavior of the cells, that were subjected to these medias. Based on the analyses of the results, it may me suggested that the coconut milk was considered the best storage media in case of dental avulsion.

Keywords: Apoptosis, coconut milk, cytotoxicity, dental avulsion, macrophages


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 73-107 (Download PDF)

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