Using Video Prompting to Teach Shoe Tying to Students with Autism and Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disabilities

Abstract

A multiple baseline across two middle school students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and moderate to severe intellectual disability was used to assess the effects of a video prompting intervention on shoe tying accuracy, maintenance, and generalization. The video, depicted a nine step shoe tying task analysis where the filmed sneaker was fitted with a black and red shoelace. The video was recorded from a first-person point of view, and incorporated a pause after each step, allowing the student to attempt the step immediately following viewing. Maintenance was assessed four weeks after intervention ended, and generalization was assessed during baseline and intervention in the gymnasium as part of the students’ typical physical education class routine. Overall, video prompting was effective in teaching shoe tying to both students.  Social validity data showed the parents of both students strongly supported the video prompting strategy, as well as approved of the outcomes.

Keywords: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Intellectual Disabilities, Shoe Tying, Video Modeling


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 43-54 (Download PDF)

Creative Commons Licence
This work by European American Journals is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License