Superstitious Beliefs and Academic Performance of Pupils in Early Childhood Science in Ogoja Educational Zone, South Eastern Nigeria.

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the influence of superstitious beliefs on academic performance of pupils in early childhood science. The research design was ex-post factor. A random sample of four hundred (400) pupils was used. Data for the study were collected through a forty item three-point Likert-scale type questionnaire on Superstitious Beliefs and Science Achievement Test. The data were analyzed using Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA) and tested at P < 0.05 level of significance. A post hoc pair-wise comparison was made using LSD to compare main and interaction effects. Results showed that academic performance of early childhood pupils was significantly decreased by superstitious beliefs in the four basic categories of “Good luck”, “Bad luck”, “Impending danger” and “Perceived effect”. Social study curriculum in early childhood schools was recommended to be broadened to teach concepts in superstitions which may reduce pupils beliefs and enhance the teaching of science.

Keywords: : Academic Performance, Beliefs, Early Childhood Science, Nigeria, Superstition

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 54-62 (Download PDF)

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