Tag Archives: Zinc

Assessment of Copper and Zinc contamination through vehicular emission on vegetables growing near road side (Published)

Vegetables are important sources of many nutrient, including vitamins, dietary fibre, folate (folic acid), and minerals and have beneficial antioxidative effects. Heavy metals like Cu and Zn can easily enter in our body through consumption of vegetables contaminated with such metals. The toxic levels of the Zinc and Copper in leafy vegetables growing near road side fields were highly dependent on vehicular exhaust and non-exhaust emissions. Industrial emissions and the frequency of brake use and vehicles coming to a complete stop were additional factors that affected the contamination levels of Zn and Cu in leafy vegetables. The concrete highway also had higher contamination levels of such heavy metals than the asphalt highway. Vehicle speed was also a Major factor contributing to the contamination of higher level of Cu and Zn in road side vegetation of heavy traffic areas. The significant level of Cu in vegetables growing in road sides areas may be due to high rate of brake abrasion from the vehicles and the levels of zinc in vegetables is due to tyre abrasion from vehicles as zinc oxide is used as a vulcanizing agent in making tyre rubber. The main aim of this review article is to determine the level of Cu and Zn in leafy vegetables collected from road side (heavy traffic) areas.

Keywords: Copper, Heavy Metals, Vegetables, Zinc

Zinc and Covid-19: Novel Ways to Maintain Optimal Zinc Balance (Published)

The earlier studies have shown that zinc deficiency can hinder host-defense systems to increase the susceptibility to various viral and bacterial infections, and thus in view of the global COVID-19 pandemic, potential protective effect of zinc is of particular interest.  As it has become clear that zinc deficiency is induced by the non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) based on the our works, the use of our non-toxic iron chelators can be recommended as the supportive treatment in therapy of COVID-19 infection, because our iron chelators may prevent the zinc deficiency by inhibiting the formation of iron deposition containing much iron and zinc ions through removing or controlling the iron(III) ions in NTBI.

Keywords: Anti-oxidant Function, COVID-19, Iron Deposition, NTBI, Zinc

The Effects of Chlorinated Drinking Water on Pig’s Spleen DNA Treated with Zinc Sulphate and Glutathione (Published)

Background and Aim: Disinfection of surface waters is often done to destroy pathogenic organisms present in water bodies in order to render water safe for consumption, but chlorination of drinking waters has been debated as being toxic to experimental animals including man. The aim of this work was to investigate using biochemical techniques whether disinfection of drinking water by chlorination is harmful or not. Materials and Methods: The materials used were water, calcium hypochlorite, Pig’s spleen, zinc sulphate and reduced glutathione. The water sample was obtained from river Jama’are in Bauchi state, and its quality assessed by estimation of temperature, pH, total dissolved solids, total hardness, Cl, SO32-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ contents. The water sample was chlorinated using calcium hypochlorite (65-70% Cl2). DNA was isolated from Pig’s spleen and used as a model to test the direct effect of the chlorinated water sample on animal health. The effect was monitored spectrophotometrically. The effect of the chlorinated water sample on the biomolecule was also studied in the presence of zinc sulphate and glutathione (GSH). This was compared with that of a control experiment. Results: The results revealed that the chlorinated water sample altered the native structure of the isolated DNA. But in the presence of 0.1mM zinc sulphate and varied concentrations of GSH (0.1mM, 0.2mM and 0.3mM respectively) the chlorinated sample was found to have no noticeable effect on the isolated biomolecule; a pointer that Zn and GSH may have conjugated with chlorinated water products and detoxified them. Conclusion: It is suggested that drinking of chlorinated water is not harmful to health.

 

Keywords: Chlorination, DNA, Glutathione, Health, Pig, Water, Zinc

The Effects of Chlorinated Drinking Water on Pig’s Spleen DNA Treated with Zinc Sulphate and Glutathione (Published)

Background and Aim: Disinfection of surface waters is often done to destroy pathogenic organisms present in water bodies in order to render water safe for consumption. But chlorination of drinking waters has been debated as being toxic to experimental animals including man. The aim of this work was to investigate using biochemical techniques whether disinfection of drinking water by chlorination is harmful or not. Materials and Methods: The materials used were water, calcium hypochlorite, Pig’s spleen, zinc sulphate and reduced glutathione. The water sample was obtained from river Jama’are in Bauchi state, and its quality assessed by estimation of temperature, pH, total dissolved solids, total hardness, Cl-, SO32-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ contents. The water sample was chlorinated using calcium hypochlorite (65-70% Cl2). DNA was isolated from Pig’s spleen and used as a model to test the direct effect of the chlorinated water sample on animal health. The effect was monitored spectrophotometrically. The effect of the chlorinated water sample on the biomolecule was also studied in the presence of zinc sulphate and glutathione (GSH). This was compared with that of a control experiment. Results: The results revealed that the chlorinated water sample altered the native structure of the isolated DNA. But in the presence of 0.1mM zinc sulphate and varied concentrations of GSH (0.1mM, 0.2mM and 0.3mM respectively) the chlorinated sample was found to have no noticeable effect on the isolated biomolecule; a pointer that Zn and GSH may have conjugated with chlorinated water products and detoxified them. Conclusion: It is suggested that drinking of chlorinated water is not harmful to health.

Keywords: Chlorination, DNA, Glutathione, Health, Pig, Water, Zinc

Effect of Zinc Supplementation on Thyroids Hormones in Sera of Diabetic Patients Type 2 (Published)

This study was carried out to investigate the effect of Zinc supplementation on the serum levels of TT4 and TT3 . Zinc concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in sera of diabetic patients’ type (2) and healthy individuals. The results show a high significant deficiency of zinc concentration (P < 0.001) in diabetic patients when comparison with healthy group. In addition ,our study investigates the effect of zinc oral supplementation on thyroids hormones in diabetics (Type 2) by the use of two control groups ( A:Healthy control ) , and ( B : Diabetic control ) , and C-group treated with zinc supplements for 10 weeks period .The results shows that the elevation of TT4 and TT3 level in C group after the intake of zinc supplementation and this elevation was highly significant (P< 0.001) .

Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Thyroxine, Triiodothyronine, Zinc