Tag Archives: Yoruba

Ethnomusicological Enquiry into Contemporary Indigenously Inclined Ìjálá Music in Yoruba Land (Published)

Yoruba social music appeal to traditional audience who are accustomed to the conventional property embedded in it. The appeal facilitates an increasing number of traditionally inclined social music practitioners who are gradually directing their efforts towards the creation of new form of ensemble music. Ethnographic method of data collection used in the study revealed that Ìjálá genre is text-based with symbolic use of words and allusion varying from place to place. It is monophonic in concept and the subject is centered on praise and adoration. It is seen as a verbal tool in the context of Ìjálá performances. The finding reveals the functional process of oral genre from place to place within a family or otherwise. Information on the use of Ìjálá music for different occasions was significant to the study.  It further reveals the healing process of the oral genre.

Keywords: Ensemble, Music, Social, Yoruba, chant, Ìjálá

Interrogating Capital Punishment and Indigenous Yoruba African Culture (Published)

This work interrogates capital punishment and indigenous Yoruba African culture. We examine punishment as a concept and the four theories of punishment which include; Utilitarian theory of punishment, Deterrent theory of punishment, Reform theory of punishment, Retributive theory of punishment. We also look into what punishment is and what punishment is not and then carry out a brief analysis of capital punishment. We then examine Yoruba African culture with respect to capital punishment; the work show clearly that Yoruba culture abhor capital punishment in their laws, the implement it and supported it with different proverbs and folklore stories. Today, there have being clamoring from every angle for the abolition of capital punishment in our society and Yoruba as a nation should not be left alone because; “Ikú tó ń pa ojúgbà ẹni, òwe ló ń pa fún ni” (‘the death that is consuming one’s peers is proverbially warning of one’s own impending similar death’).

Keywords: Africa, Capital, Culture, Folklore, Proverbs, Punishment, Yoruba

Interrogating Capital Punishment and Indigenous Yoruba African Culture (Published)

This work interrogates capital punishment and indigenous Yoruba African culture. We examine punishment as a concept and the four theories of punishment which include; Utilitarian theory of punishment, Deterrent theory of punishment, Reform theory of punishment, Retributive theory of punishment. We also look into what punishment is and what punishment is not and then carry out a brief analysis of capital punishment. We then examine Yoruba African culture with respect to capital punishment; the work show clearly that Yoruba culture abhor capital punishment in their laws, the implement it and supported it with different proverbs and folklore stories. Today, there have being clamoring from every angle for the abolition of capital punishment in our society and Yoruba as a nation should not be left alone because; “Ikú tó ń pa ojúgbà ẹni, òwe ló ń pa fún ni” (‘the death that is consuming one’s peers is proverbially warning of one’s own impending similar death’).

Keywords: Africa, Capital, Culture, Folklore, Proverbs, Punishment, Yoruba

The Impact of Gender Discrimination on National Development (Published)

The paper argues that gender discrimination is as old as creation. Over the years women were made to belief that their rightful place was in the home front as housewives producers and minders of children. The paper focuses on cultural, societal and religious practices, in our traditional society that prevent women from contributing their quota to both the community and the nation at large. In this modern world where women have assumed prominent roles in the economic, political, and social developments in different societies, there is a clarion call for both the government and other men of the country to be supportive of their female counterparts as this will enable them to exhibit their potentials for the benefit of the development of our nation. The paper concludes that there should be mass literacy campaign towards women education. Education shapes the life of women by equipping them with knowledge, skills, right attitudes and values to participate effectively and also contribute meaningfully to national development.

Keywords: Culture, Development, Education, Women, Yoruba

Language And Culture Among The Yoruba: A Study Of Argot, Cant, Jargons And Slang As Forerunners Of The New Idioms And Idiomatic Expression In The 21st Century (Published)

Argot, Cant, Jargons and slang are phenomenal forerunners of the new idioms and idiomatic expressions in Yoruba. They are universal phenomenon and aspect of social language that cannot be underestimated in every sense of functional human society where language and culture are seen as natural, divine and systemic in the 21st century. This paper attempts to discuss the historical evolution, definition, denotative and connotative meanings of these sociolects especially in relation to the existence and emergence of the new idiom and idiomatic expression in Yoruba with a view to expunging their similarities and differencia specifica.

Keywords: Yoruba, forerunners., idiomatic expression, language and culture, social language

New Yoruba Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions: A New Mode of Expression in Political Arena (Published)

New idioms and idiomatic expressions, which are modern stock expressions, constitute communicative clogs in Yorùbá routine discourses because of their semantic complexity and deviant nature. Existing studies have established their scope of usage in Yorùbá music but have hardly addressed their communicative adaptability in politics. This paper investigated issues expressed with these idioms, context and strategies for using them in political arena. This is with a view to establishing their communicative and stylistic relevance in Yorùbá discourses. The paper adopted Mukarovsky’s theory of Standard Language because of its capacity to explain the “differential specifica” between the language of everyday interaction and literary language.  Data were collected from different routine communicative discourses of  politicians and party members on radio, during political rallies or campaigns and were subjected to pragmatic and stylistic analysis. Political issues were expressed using new idioms and idiomatic expressions in the following sociopolitical contexts: Eté for corruption/stealing; Ojúyọbọ́ for under achiever; Yóó wọlé ẹ̀ẹ̀ken si for deceit; Ó bọ̀jẹ́ tì for collective support; Oyin ni o for a successful tenure; Ajímọ̀bi for collective responsibility; Nàìjá for affection/disappointment and Kárí go/Kárí kọọ̀mù for continuity and discontinuity. Nominalisation, Pidginisation and dialect expressions were the strategies employed for the formation of new idioms in this paper. These strategies were used to express different political happenings contextualized in underachievement, sloganeering for support, deceit,  and acceptance/rejection for second term in office respectively. New idioms and idiomatic expressions, used to express sociopolitical issues in Yorùbá routine communication, occurred in mediated and non-mediated contexts  and were conveyed through nominalization, pidginisation, and dialect expressions.  These idioms reflect dynamism and modernity-constrained stylistic choices in Yorùbá.

Keywords: New Idioms, Politics Stylistics, Strategies., Yoruba

New Yoruba Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions: A New Mode of Expression in Political Arena (Published)

New idioms and idiomatic expressions, which are modern stock expressions, constitute communicative clogs in Yorùbá routine discourses because of their semantic complexity and deviant nature. Existing studies have established their scope of usage in Yorùbá music but have hardly addressed their communicative adaptability in politics. This paper investigated issues expressed with these idioms, context and strategies for using them in political arena. This is with a view to establishing their communicative and stylistic relevance in Yorùbá discourses. The paper adopted Mukarovsky’s theory of Standard Language because of its capacity to explain the “differential specifica” between the language of everyday interaction and literary language.  Data were collected from different routine communicative discourses of  politicians and party members on radio, during political rallies or campaigns and were subjected to pragmatic and stylistic analysis. Political issues were expressed using new idioms and idiomatic expressions in the following sociopolitical contexts: Eté for corruption/stealing; Ojúyọbọ́ for under achiever; Yóó wọlé ẹ̀ẹ̀ken si for deceit; Ó bọ̀jẹ́ tì for collective support; Oyin ni o for a successful tenure; Ajímọ̀bi for collective responsibility; Nàìjá for affection/disappointment and Kárí go/Kárí kọọ̀mù for continuity and discontinuity. Nominalisation, Pidginisation and dialect expressions were the strategies employed for the formation of new idioms in this paper. These strategies were used to express different political happenings contextualized in underachievement, sloganeering for support, deceit,  and acceptance/rejection for second term in office respectively. New idioms and idiomatic expressions, used to express sociopolitical issues in Yorùbá routine communication, occurred in mediated and non-mediated contexts  and were conveyed through nominalization, pidginisation, and dialect expressions.  These idioms reflect dynamism and modernity-constrained stylistic choices in Yorùbá.

Keywords: New Idioms, Politics Stylistics, Strategies., Yoruba

New Yoruba Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions: A New Mode of Expression in Political Arena (Published)

New idioms and idiomatic expressions, which are modern stock expressions, constitute communicative clogs in Yorùbá routine discourses because of their semantic complexity and deviant nature. Existing studies have established their scope of usage in Yorùbá music but have hardly addressed their communicative adaptability in politics. This paper investigated issues expressed with these idioms, context and strategies for using them in political arena. This is with a view to establishing their communicative and stylistic relevance in Yorùbá discourses. The paper adopted Mukarovsky’s theory of Standard Language because of its capacity to explain the “differential specifica” between the language of everyday interaction and literary language.  Data were collected from different routine communicative discourses of  politicians and party members on radio, during political rallies or campaigns and were subjected to pragmatic and stylistic analysis. Political issues were expressed using new idioms and idiomatic expressions in the following sociopolitical contexts: Eté for corruption/stealing; Ojúyọbọ́ for under achiever; Yóó wọlé ẹ̀ẹ̀ken si for deceit; Ó bọ̀jẹ́ tì for collective support; Oyin ni o for a successful tenure; Ajímọ̀bi for collective responsibility; Nàìjá for affection/disappointment and Kárí go/Kárí kọọ̀mù for continuity and discontinuity. Nominalisation, Pidginisation and dialect expressions were the strategies employed for the formation of new idioms in this paper. These strategies were used to express different political happenings contextualized in underachievement, sloganeering for support, deceit, and acceptance/rejection for second term in office respectively. New idioms and idiomatic expressions, used to express sociopolitical issues in Yorùbá routine communication, occurred in mediated and non-mediated contexts and were conveyed through nominalization, pidginisation, and dialect expressions.  These idioms reflect dynamism and modernity-constrained stylistic choices in Yorùbá.

Keywords: New Idioms, Politics Stylistics, Strategies., Yoruba

Interrogating Capital Punishment and Indigenous Yoruba African Culture (Published)

This work interrogates capital punishment and indigenous Yoruba African culture. We examine punishment as a concept and the four theories of punishment which include; Utilitarian theory of punishment, Deterrent theory of punishment, Reform theory of punishment, Retributive theory of punishment. We also look into what punishment is and what punishment is not and then carry out a brief analysis of capital punishment. We then examine Yoruba African culture with respect to capital punishment; the work show clearly that Yoruba culture abhor capital punishment in their laws, the implement it and supported it with different proverbs and folklore stories. Today, there have being clamoring from every angle for the abolition of capital punishment in our society and Yoruba as a nation should not be left alone because; “Ikú tó ń pa ojúgbà ẹni, òwe ló ń pa fún ni” (‘the death that is consuming one’s peers is proverbially warning of one’s own impending similar death’).

Keywords: Africa, Capital, Culture, Folklore, Proverbs, Punishment, Yoruba

New Yoruba Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions: A New Mode of Expression in Political Arena (Published)

New idioms and idiomatic expressions, which are modern stock expressions, constitute communicative clogs in Yorùbá routine discourses because of their semantic complexity and deviant nature. Existing studies have established their scope of usage in Yorùbá music but have hardly addressed their communicative adaptability in politics. This paper investigated issues expressed with these idioms, context and strategies for using them in political arena. This is with a view to establishing their communicative and stylistic relevance in Yorùbá discourses. The paper adopted Mukarovsky’s theory of Standard Language because of its capacity to explain the “differential specifica” between the language of everyday interaction and literary language.  Data were collected from different routine communicative discourses of  politicians and party members on radio, during political rallies or campaigns and were subjected to pragmatic and stylistic analysis. Political issues were expressed using new idioms and idiomatic expressions in the following sociopolitical contexts: Eté for corruption/stealing; Ojúyọbọ́ for under achiever; Yóó wọlé ẹ̀ẹ̀ken si for deceit; Ó bọ̀jẹ́ tì for collective support; Oyin ni o for a successful tenure; Ajímọ̀bi for collective responsibility; Nàìjá for affection/disappointment and Kárí go/Kárí kọọ̀mù for continuity and discontinuity. Nominalisation, Pidginisation and dialect expressions were the strategies employed for the formation of new idioms in this paper. These strategies were used to express different political happenings contextualized in underachievement, sloganeering for support, deceit,  and acceptance/rejection for second term in office respectively. New idioms and idiomatic expressions, used to express sociopolitical issues in Yorùbá routine communication, occurred in mediated and non-mediated contexts  and were conveyed through nominalization, pidginisation, and dialect expressions.  These idioms reflect dynamism and modernity-constrained stylistic choices in Yorùbá.

Keywords: New Idioms, Politics Stylistics, Strategies., Yoruba

Paradigm Shifts in the Yoruba Anthroponyms: A Critical Discourse Analysis on Yoruba Reincanated-Child`s Names (Published)

The main thrust of the paper is the illumination of the interactions between the language use and the Yoruba cultural anthropology as attested to by a set of Yoruba names known as the àbíkú (reincarnated child`s) names. The names are considered as registers because they aptly identify discourse that occurs in particular recurrent situations within the contexts of the people’s social experience and beliefs. The factors that make the usage of these names to become atrophied are identified to illustrate the paradigm shifts in the people`s cultural anthropology. In doing this, the sociolinguistic values of Yoruba names are expatiated and categorized to elicit the contemporary perception of the names. The study found that àbíkú names stand out linguo-culturally in Yoruba onomastics and are significantly complex to be merely positioned within either the purview of core linguistics or socio-religious perspectives alone as their expositions also include anthropological identities and situational parameters of variation. Among other things, this verbal text provides unique opportunities for the people to externalize social- psychology to capture the name giver`s emotions and in the process, aptly casts identifiable marks on the bearer, thus stratifying the society in a way. Conclusively it is contended that this brand of name-words represent the signposts which encode the social perceptions on certain individuals and episodes of enduring identities in the past which have now been regrettably eroded and debased by critical waves of the so-called modernity.

Keywords: Africa Language, Child Name, Language, Linguistic, Yoruba

Suicide in Yoruba Ontology (Published)

Suicide is generally regarded as all cases of death resulting from action taken by the victim themselves, and with the intention and prospect of killing oneself. The cause is frequently attributed to psychological disorders, substance abuse, shame, guilty, rejection, loss, and loneliness, death of a loved one, emotional trauma, serious physical illness, and unemployment or money problems. In this paper, the researcher studies the problem of suicide from Yoruba perspective. Yoruba is a language and the name of an ethnic group or tribe in Nigeria. The paper interrogates Yoruba concept of death, the quality of death through suicide and suicide among the Yoruba. For the Yoruba, when it comes to the issue of autonomy and competence as regards deciding on suicide, they would metaphorically claim that ‘bose wuni lase imole eni’ (one determines one’s faith the way one deems fit) drawing from the cultural construct of the Yoruba worldview that celebrate suicide in avoidance of shame- iku ya j’esin- a principle of dignity in dying. This understanding of suicide from an Yoruba perspective is believed will help enhance the value of human life and thus save the world from being plunged into a silent crisis of the value of life.

Keywords: Africa, Autonomy, Honor, Ontology, Suicide, Victim, Yoruba, ignominy

A COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM FOR VERB SORTING AND ARRANGEMENT IN A NATURAL LANGUAGE: CASE STUDY OF THE NIGERIAN YORUBA LANGUAGE (Published)

The context of Understanding has continued to be a major attraction to researchers in Natural Language Processing. This is built on the theory that language can be used effectively if it is understood and can be analyzed and as such, most Natural Language Processing research tend towards the belief that the human brain has a section dedicated for language analysis and understanding therefore, human ambiguity which, remains the major difference between natural and computer languages, can be modeled using appropriate man machine modeling tools since programming languages are designed to be unambiguous, that is, they can be defined by a grammar that produces a unique parse for each sentence in the language. The paper evaluates the classification process for a Natural language ‘the Yoruba language’ and presents a new method by which the language can be transformed into a computer understandable language using its morphological identification framework. Result shows that the approach is admissibly in line with known benchmarks. The paper recommends that non tonal language can also be experimented using the defined approach.

Keywords: Model, Morphology, Natural language, Tonal Language, Yoruba

Suicide in Yoruba Ontology (Review Completed - Accepted)

Suicide is generally regarded as all cases of death resulting from action taken by the victim themselves, and with the intention and prospect of killing oneself. The cause is frequently attributed to psychological disorders, substance abuse, shame, guilty, rejection, loss, loneliness, death of a loved one, emotional trauma, serious physical illness, and unemployment or money problems. In this paper, the researcher studies the problem of suicide from Yoruba perspective. Yoruba is a language and the name of an ethnic group or tribe in Nigeria. The paper interrogates Yoruba concept of death, the quality of death through suicide and suicide among the Yoruba. For the Yoruba, when it comes to the issue of autonomy and competence as regards deciding on suicide, they would metaphorically claim that ‘bose wuni lase imole eni’ (one determines one’s faith the way one deems fit) drawing from the cultural construct of the Yoruba worldview that celebrate suicide in avoidance of shame- iku ya j’esin- a principle of dignity in dying. This understanding of suicide from an Yoruba perspective is believed will help enhance the value of human life and thus save the world from being plunged into a silent crisis of the value of life

Keywords: Africa, Autonomy, Honor, Ontology, Suicide, Victim, Yoruba, ignominy

A COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM FOR VERB SORTING AND ARRANGEMENT IN A NATURAL LANGUAGE: CASE STUDY OF THE NIGERIAN YORUBA LANGUAGE (Review Completed - Accepted)

The context of Understanding has continued to be a major attraction to researchers in Natural Language Processing. This is built on the theory that language can be used effectively if it is understood and can be analyzed and as such, most Natural Language Processing research tend towards the belief that the human brain has a section dedicated for language analysis and understanding therefore, human ambiguity which, remains the major difference between natural and computer languages, can be modeled using appropriate man machine modeling tools since programming languages are designed to be unambiguous, that is, they can be defined by a grammar that produces a unique parse for each sentence in the language. The paper evaluates the classification process for a Natural language ‘the Yoruba language’ and presents a new method by which the language can be transformed into a computer understandable language using its morphological identification framework. Result shows that the approach is admissibly in line with known benchmarks. The paper recommends that non tonal language can also be experimented using the defined approach

Keywords: Model, Morphology, Natural language, Tonal Language, Yoruba

A COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM FOR VERB SORTING AND ARRANGEMENT IN A NATURAL LANGUAGE: CASE STUDY OF THE NIGERIAN YORUBA LANGUAGE ()

The context of Understanding has continued to be a major attraction to researchers in Natural Language Processing. This is built on the theory that language can be used effectively if it is understood and can be analyzed and as such, most Natural Language Processing research tend towards the belief that the human brain has a section dedicated for language analysis and understanding therefore, human ambiguity which, remains the major difference between natural and computer languages, can be modeled using appropriate man machine modeling tools since programming languages are designed to be unambiguous, that is, they can be defined by a grammar that produces a unique parse for each sentence in the language. The paper evaluates the classification process for a Natural language ‘the Yoruba language’ and presents a new method by which the language can be transformed into a computer understandable language using its morphological identification framework. Result shows that the approach is admissibly in line with known benchmarks. The paper recommends that non tonal language can also be experimented using the defined approach.

Keywords: Model, Morphology, Natural language, Tonal Language, Yoruba

Incorporating Traditional Architecture into Modern Architecture: Case Study of Yoruba Traditional Architecture (Review Completed - Accepted)

This paper first examines the characteristics of traditional architecture with particular reference to the Yorubas of western Nigeria. In this respect, the paper examines various aspects including the characteristic layout patterns of the courtyard, the functionality and general characteristics of the compound, and the unity of purpose and functions provided by the characteristics of the housing. The paper, also discuss the aesthetics provided, the social services and the characteristics of environmental adaptation, for example, in the use of the materials, and the characteristics of the shapes and structures of the houses. The paper finally examines how the characteristics of these aspects of Yoruba architecture can be incorporated into modern architecture particularly with respect to the layout or pattern in the concept of genealogy based on descent relation to cultural values, and preservation of family ties. The paper also examines the functionality of the architectural patterns and layout especially with regards to socializing, recreation and productive economic activities. Adaptation to the environment interms of local raw materials and promoting comfortable indoor climates are also the focus of this paper.

Keywords: Incorporating, Modern Architecture, Traditional Architecture, Yoruba