Tag Archives: sub-Saharan Africa

CEO Characteristics and Capital Structure in Listed Sub-Saharan African Firms (Published)

The study focuses of five CEO characteristics with the aim of discovering the possible link between these characteristics and the capital structures of the firms they are attributed to. The study applied parametric or non-parametric test (depending on the outcome of the normality test) to determine the nature of relationship between CEO characteristics and capital structure. Data for this study was obtained from three sub-Saharan African countries: Kenya (twenty companies), Nigeria (twenty-three companies) and South Africa (twenty-one companies) for a period of five years (2012 to 2016). CEO nationality characteristic (which is a proxy for international experience/competence for the CEO) was found to be significant to the capital structure of companies.

Keywords: CEO gender, CEO nationality, CEO share ownership, CEO tenure, Capital Structure, sub-Saharan Africa

CEO Characteristics and Dividend Payout in Sub-Saharan Africa (Published)

The study examined the effect of CEO characteristics of tenure, nationality, gender and share ownership on the dividend paid by sixty-four companies located in Sub-Saharan Africa. It used data for five years (from 2012 to 2016) and covered three Sub-Saharan African countries. Twenty companies were selected from the sixty-five listed on the Kenyan Stock Exchange; twenty-three from the one hundred and seventy-two on the Nigerian Stock Exchange and twenty-one of the three hundred and seventy-six companies listed on Johannesburg Stock Exchange. Kruskal Wallis was applied to test four hypotheses. Two CEO characteristics – nationality and share ownership – were found to have significant relationship to dividend payout in the data available for the study.

Keywords: CEO gender, CEO nationality, CEO share ownership, CEO tenure, Dividend payout, sub-Saharan Africa

Africa’s Mobile Agricultural Revolution: Farming Apps in Sub-Saharan Africa (Published)

Mobile phones have gone from luxury items to daily essentials in the lives of billions of people around the world. The start-up boom encouraged the creation of numerous apps targeting specific market niches and in the last decade, they have become more sophisticated offering thousands of streamlined services. With the touch of a button they are able to grant end-users access to various resources in different sectors, including agriculture. This paper evaluates the stance of mobile agricultural apps in sub-Saharan Africa. It gives a brief history on their development and points out why they have been a successful farm improvement tool in subsistence agriculture. It also identifies possible challenges that may stifle their applicability and growth potential in the region. It then goes ahead to highlight possible ways to mitigate these challenges

Keywords: Agriculture, apps, sub-Saharan Africa

CULTURAL RE-ENGINEERING: THE WAY OUT OF HUMAN RIGHTS SUBVERSION IN SUB SAHARAN AFRICA, NIGERIA A CASE STUDY (Published)

The importance of culture need not be over emphasized in the life of a community, as it is a sign of their identity. Cultural practices reflect the fundamental values of the community which are geared towards protecting members of the community. These practices are good where they fulfil these functions. But sometimes traditional cultural practices are harmful, with negative consequences, violating human rights. This work asserts that cultural belief is one of the major reasons why human rights are violated. The world is not stagnant, but continues to evolve. With new discoveries and philosophies, world’s systems change and the world adjusts to the demands of the changing times. Cultures and traditions are no exceptions. Cultural rites are human rights, insofar as they relate to and affect human beings. The aim of this work is to identify some of these harmful traditional cultural practices that violate human rights and suggest ways in which they can be re-engineered to bring cultural practices in consonance with the human rights system, within the traditional setting

Keywords: Culture, Human Rights, Re-Engineering, sub-Saharan Africa

The Influence of Legitimacy and Marketing in the Context of Accounting for the Environment in a Sub-Saharan African Country (Published)

Purpose – The paper intends to serve as a contribution to the requirements for organizations to account for and disclose the social and environmental (SE) consequences of their activities, aspects of the concept of sustainability accounting (SA). In particular, this research study investigates the current practices of environmental accounting (EA), whether it is influenced by the same values as that of society and is used as a marketing tool of the oil and gas sector in Uganda, a less developed country. Design/methodology/approach – The study involved 57 oil and petroleum supply chains. Major data collection methods included a review of 13 annual reports/statements by oil companies and both a structured and a semi-structured questionnaire involving 272 respondents, with a response rate of 57.0%. A mixed-methodological approach was employed to analyze the qualitative and quantitative data together. Findings – (1) There are no detailed archival records related to EA; (2) respondents’ (106) responses to the possible consequences of not accounting for the environment were almost indifferent on issues that influence marketing, indicated by the small differences in the mean (1.83 to 2.50) and standard deviations (0.504 to 0.925); (3) responses on the influence of legitimacy and marketing on accounting for the environment ranged from 8.3% to 90.0%, while the mean ranged from 1.92 to 3.90 and the standard deviations from 0.303 to 1.482; (4) we suggest that EA is currently not being done, which is an indicator of poor management of the environment; (5) the results support that a marketing tool is not a significant determining factor of accounting for the environment, despite having a social role to fulfill; and (6) the results do support the theory of legitimacy, because oil and petroleum products suppliers in the country respond to environmental laws, regulations and guidelines. Originality/value – The highlighted perspective on how organizations account for and disclose the environmental trends of their activities – an aspect of the concept of SA in Uganda, a country with a youthful population, open markets, abundant resources and significant unexploited oil and gas reserves – distinguishes this study from others on similar topics.

Keywords: Environment, Legitimacy., Marketing, oil and gas sector, sub-Saharan Africa, sustainability accounting