Tag Archives: Size

Evaluation of Integrated Reporting and the Value of Listed Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria (Published)

Integrated reporting is gaining attention of world-leading organizations and countries who are demonstrating global leadership in this emerging field of corporate reporting. However, the disclosure of non-financial information and its integration with financial information (integrated reports) and the benefits to the company and other stakeholders is not yet properly assessed in Nigeria. Prior studies in this area in different environments have produced mixed results and conclusions. This study examined the effect of integrated reporting on the value of listed manufacturing companies in Nigeria. The study adopted ex-post facto research design. The population of the study comprised 53 manufacturing companies quoted on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) as at 30th June 2017, from which 38 companies were purposively selected comprising companies from consumer goods and industrial goods during the study period (2012-2016). Data were sourced from the published audited financial statements validated by the external auditors’ report. Descriptive and inferential statistics using regression analyses were employed. The findings revealed that integrated reporting had significant effects on firm’s value measured by Tobin’s Q (TQ) (F(4, 131) = 22.75, Adj. R2 = .1470, p <0.05). Disclosure of Financial Capital (DFC) had a significant negative effect on TQ (β1 = -4.41; t(135)= -6.71, p <0.05); Disclosure of Manufactured Capital (DMC) had an insignificant positive effect on TQ (β2 = 0.051; t(135)= 0.14, p >0.05); Disclosure of Intellectual and Human Capital (DIHC) had an insignificant negative effect on TQ (β3 = -0.994; t(135)= -0.69, p >0.05); and Disclosure of Natural Capital (DNC) had an insignificant negative effect on TQ (β4 = -0.438; t(135)= -0.41, p >0.05). Firms’ size (SIZE) and leverage (FLEV) had significantly controlled the influence of integrated reporting on TQ (F(6,129) = 24.08, Adj. R2 = .1636, p <0.05). The study concluded that integrated reporting is still at its early stage of adoption in Nigeria and could be useful in determining the firm’s value of listed manufacturing companies in Nigeria. It was recommended that regulators should increase awareness, training and provide a framework for the mandatory adoption of integrated reporting in Nigeria.

 

Keywords: Disclosure, Leverage, Size, firm’s value, integrated reporting, integrated thinking, tobin’s q. transformation, value creation

Evaluation of Integrated Reporting and the Value of Listed Manufacturing Firms in Nigeria (Published)

Integrated reporting is gaining attention of world-leading organizations and countries who are demonstrating global leadership in this emerging field of corporate reporting. However, the disclosure of non-financial information and its integration with financial information (integrated reports) and the benefits to the company and other stakeholders is not yet properly assessed in Nigeria. Prior studies in this area in different environments have produced mixed results and conclusions. This study examined the effect of integrated reporting on the value of listed manufacturing companies in Nigeria. The study adopted ex-post facto research design. The population of the study comprised 53 manufacturing companies quoted on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) as at 30th June 2017, from which 38 companies were purposively selected comprising companies from consumer goods and industrial goods during the study period (2012-2016). Data were sourced from the published audited financial statements validated by the external auditors’ report. Descriptive and inferential statistics using regression analyses were employed. The findings revealed that integrated reporting had significant effects on firm’s value measured by Tobin’s Q (TQ) (F(4, 131) = 22.75, Adj. R2 = .1470, p <0.05). Disclosure of Financial Capital (DFC) had a significant negative effect on TQ (β1 = -4.41; t(135)= -6.71, p <0.05); Disclosure of Manufactured Capital (DMC) had an insignificant positive effect on TQ (β2 = 0.051; t(135)= 0.14, p >0.05); Disclosure of Intellectual and Human Capital (DIHC) had an insignificant negative effect on TQ (β3 = -0.994; t(135)= -0.69, p >0.05); and Disclosure of Natural Capital (DNC) had an insignificant negative effect on TQ (β4 = -0.438; t(135)= -0.41, p >0.05). Firms’ size (SIZE) and leverage (FLEV) had significantly controlled the influence of integrated reporting on TQ (F(6,129) = 24.08, Adj. R2 = .1636, p <0.05). The study concluded that integrated reporting is still at its early stage of adoption in Nigeria and could be useful in determining the firm’s value of listed manufacturing companies in Nigeria. It was recommended that regulators should increase awareness, training and provide a framework for the mandatory adoption of integrated reporting in Nigeria.

Keywords: Disclosure, Leverage, Size, firm’s value, integrated reporting, integrated thinking, tobin’s q. transformation, value creation

Effectiveness of Product Packaging on Customer Patronage of Bournvita in Ekiti State (Published)

The study examined the effectiveness of product packaging on customer patronage. Survey method was adopted. Data were collected using structured questionnaire and purposive sampling was used to determine respondents. Sample size of 322 was used. Collected data were analysed using descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression. Constructs tested as explanatory variables were product size, colour, quality of packaging material, quality of product content and shape. The results showed that all the tested variables have significant positive effects on customer patronage of Bournvita. In order of significant, the R2 change, in order of hierarch, for the variables was: product size =.215, quality of packaging material =.058, colour = .049, shape =.044, and quality of product content = .028. It was concluded that customer decision to patronise could be influenced by taken into consideration size, colour, package material, product content and shape of a product. Based on these findings, it is recommended, among others, that producing different sizes of the product should be a continuous practice that firm should undertake. As well, producers should consciously adopt colours suitable and capable of appealing to customer interest and consequently influence their choice of a product by mere sighting of the package colour.

Keywords: Colour, Customer patronage, Packaging, Size, packaging material, quality of product content and shape

Effect of Bank Specific Factors on Bank Loan Performance in Nepal (Published)

This study examines the effect of bank specific factors on loan performance of commercial banks in Nepal. Bank size, capital, deposit, liquidity ratio and lending interest rate are taken as bank specific factors. The study has conducted correlation and regression analysis using panel data of twenty four commercial banks during the period of 1996 -2017. The empirical results show that bank size, capital and deposit have positive impact on bank lending. Hence, commercial bank willing to increase lending should increase its capital, even more than regulatory standard. Further banks willing to lend more should expand their total assets and deposit. Liquidity ratio and interest rate have negative impact on bank lending. Thus, commercial banks willing to increase bank lending, should be careful in maintaining minimum liquidity requirement and interest rate fluctuation. Central bank willing to increase bank lending to productive sector should encourage banks to decline their lending interest rate.

Keywords: Bank Lending, Capital, Deposit, Interest Rate, Liquidity Ratio, Regression, Size

Bank Capital and Profitability: A Study of Selected Banks in Ghana (Published)

The study investigated the relationship between bank equity capital and profitability by sampling fourteen (14) banks, using the purposive sampling technique, out of the twentyeight (28) universal banks operating in Ghana at the time, with data covering an eleven- year period (2005-2015). The study adopted the panel data methodology to examine the effect of bank capital on profitability. The random-effects Generalised Least Square (GLS) regression was adopted as an estimation technique for the research.  The study revealed that equity capital is significantly and positively related to Net Interest Margin (NIM), and Return-on-Equity (ROE). Bank size is significantly and negatively related to ROE, and insignificantly inversely related to NIM. Regulated bank capital is a disincentive to inclusive financial intermediation in Ghana.

Keywords: Bank, Capital, Equity, Ghana, Profitability, Size