Tag Archives: Significant bacteriuria

Prevalence, Associated Factors, Bacterial and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Urinary Tract Infections in a Sample of Iraqi Pregnant Women in Al-Najaf (Published)

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are rendered as the most common bacterial infections prevailing among humans, both in the community and hospital settings. In pregnancy, UTI can lead to poor maternal and perinatal outcomes. The current cross-sectional study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of UTI in pregnant women, to determine its association with sociodemographic, obstetrical and other factors, and to identify causative agents with antibiotic sensitivity. A total of 300 pregnant women at Al-Zahraa teaching hospital / Al-Najaf from the 1st of April 2014 to 30th July 2014, with and without the symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), were recruited for this study. Midstream urine samples were taken and general urine examination with culture was performed. Sensitivity tests were also performed for the isolated organisms. The data pertaining to the associated risk factors were collected by using a structured questionnaire form. The results revealed that the overall prevalence of significant bacteriuria in pregnant women was 37 %, representing symptomatic and asymptomatic (23%, 14% respectively). The predominant bacterial pathogen was Escherichia coli (28.8 %), which was found to be resistant to penicillin (100 %) and cephalosporins group (40%), but sensitive to garamycin (95%) and Amikacin (90%). Factors such as type of past delivery, previous history of UTI, symptomatic patients and vaginitis were found to be significantly associated with higher rates of UTI. Significant bacteriuria was found in both symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women, which was significantly higher among those with lower age.

Keywords: Antenatal Care, Asymptomatic bacteriuria, Pregnant Women, Significant bacteriuria, UTI

Prevalence, Associated Factors, Bacterial and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Urinary Tract Infections in a Sample of Iraqi Pregnant Women in Al-Najaf (Published)

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are rendered as the most common bacterial infections prevailing among humans, both in the community and hospital settings. In pregnancy, UTI can lead to poor maternal and perinatal outcomes. The current cross-sectional study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of UTI in pregnant women, to determine its association with sociodemographic, obstetrical and other factors, and to identify causative agents with antibiotic sensitivity. A total of 300 pregnant women at Al-Zahraa teaching hospital / Al-Najaf from the 1st of April 2014 to 30th July 2014, with and without the symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), were recruited for this study. Midstream urine samples were taken and general urine examination with culture was performed. Sensitivity tests were also performed for the isolated organisms. The data pertaining to the associated risk factors were collected by using a structured questionnaire form. The results revealed that the overall prevalence of significant bacteriuria in pregnant women was 37 %, representing symptomatic and asymptomatic (23%, 14% respectively). The predominant bacterial pathogen was Escherichia coli (28.8 %), which was found to be resistant to penicillin (100 %) and cephalosporins group (40%), but sensitive to garamycin (95%) and Amikacin (90%). Factors such as type of past delivery, previous history of UTI, symptomatic patients and vaginitis were found to be significantly associated with higher rates of UTI. Significant bacteriuria was found in both symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women, which was significantly higher among those with lower age.

Keywords: Antenatal Care, Asymptomatic bacteriuria, Pregnant Women, Significant bacteriuria, UTI