Tag Archives: Pupils.

Literacy and Sustainable Health Practices among Pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area Of Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

Literacy has emerged as an approach to achieving the United Nation’s sustainable development Goals (SDGs) on good health and wellbeing for all ages and in all societies. It comes as a core purpose of public health having a far reaching agenda to include school children in order to ensure sustainable health practices within populations. However, literacy on health seems to be inadequate and excludes pupils. The situation poses a risk to the actualisation of the objective on good health and wellbeing in developing societies. This survey was conducted to examine the influence of literacy on sustainable health practices among pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. Leaned onto the social constructivist and social inclusion postulations, three research questions and null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. 200 respondents were randomly selected from the population within the research location. Data was pooled from participants via the literacy acquisition and healthcare practices questionnaire (LHPQ). The Independent t-test statistic was applied to analyse data. Findings showed that functional, interactive and critical literacy have significant influence on sustainable health practices among pupils. The recommendations reflect the adoption of inclusive strategies to enable pupils co-create knowledge and co-partner with adults on health literacy to enhance health practices in the context.

Keywords: Calabar-South, Literacy, Pupils., sustainable health practices

Psycho-Social Factors and Examination Malpractice Tendencies among Pupils in Ikom Education Zone of Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

This study examines psycho-social factors and examination malpractice tendencies among pupils in Ikom education zone of Cross River State. It inquires how these factors influence pupils’ malpractice tendencies. 520 pupils were randomly sampled for the study, 2 research questions and 2 hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Pupils’ Psycho-Social Factors and Examination Malpractice Tendencies Questionnaire (PPFEMT) was used to gather data for the study. Data was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the hypotheses were tested at 0.05 alpha level. The findings revealed that pupils’ attitude to school and pupils’ test anxiety do not significantly influence pupils’ examination malpractice tendencies. It was therefore, recommended that, head teachers should organize educational programmes on examination stress management to assist pupils cope with test anxiety etc.

Keywords: Examination, Psycho-social factors, Pupils., malpractice tendencies

Literacy and Sustainable Health Practices among Pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

Literacy has emerged as an approach to achieving the United Nation’s sustainable development Goals (SDGs) on good health and wellbeing for all ages and in all societies. It comes as a core purpose of public health having a far reaching agenda to include school children in order to ensure sustainable health practices within populations. However, literacy on health seems to be inadequate and excludes pupils. The situation poses a risk to the actualisation of the objective on good health and wellbeing in developing societies. This survey was conducted to examine the influence of literacy on sustainable health practices among pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. Leaned onto the social constructivist and social inclusion postulations, three research questions and null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. 200 respondents were randomly selected from the population within the research location. Data was pooled from participants via the literacy and health practices questionnaire (LHPQ). The Independent t-test statistic was applied to analyse data. Findings showed that functional, interactive and critical literacy have significant influence on sustainable health practices among pupils. The recommendations reflect the adoption of inclusive strategies to enable pupils co-create knowledge and co-partner with adults on health literacy to enhance health practices in the context.

Keywords: Calabar-South, Literacy, Pupils., sustainable health practices

Making Education for all Inclusive in Developing Countries (Published)

The education for all (EFA) agenda is targeted at achieving inclusive education across regions of the world including developing countries (DCs). The policy is nonetheless not inclusive in the actual sense of the concept. Emphasis of the EFA on ensuring parity in the ways male and female pupils access education in formal settings restricts the policy from becoming genuinely inclusive. Inclusive education as to be a core philosophy to moving the provisions of EFA forward encourages changes to existing local cultures that disadvantage some children and young people within education systems in DCs. It begins with the belief that education is the basic human right of all and the foundation for a more just society. Thus, inclusive education draws on the idea of social inclusion to redefine the provisions of the EFA in order to ensure that education is sincerely for ‘all’ and not nearly for all in DCs.

Keywords: DCs, EFA, Inclusion, Pupils., rural areas

Attitudes of Pupils and Teachers Towards Life Skills Education in Public Primary Schools in Eldoret Municipality, Kenya (Published)

In the year 2009, the government of Kenya introduced Life Skills Education to help the students in coping with the challenges and demands for everyday life. It is important to understand how performed since then. As such, the study was conducted to find out the preparedness of public primary schools in the implementation of Life Skills Education (LSE) curriculum in Eldoret Municipality. Based on the study, this paper examines the attitudes of pupils and teachers towards Life Skills Education in public primary schools in Eldoret Municipality. The study was based on the 1997 Functionalist theory by Kinsley Davis. The study employed a survey design. Out of the total 42 public primary schools in Eldoret Municipality 13 of them were selected through simple random sampling. A sample size of 13 head teachers was purposively selected, from the 13 schools; 39 teachers, 3 from each school, were purposively selected. These comprised teachers of LSE. Stratified sampling was used to select one teacher from lower primary, mid-upper and upper primary. Pupils in Classes Six and Seven were purposively selected. The study, therefore, sampled was 299 respondents comprising of teachers and pupils. The data collection instruments used were: questionnaires and interview schedules for head teachers. Descriptive methods were employed in data analysis and data were presented in the form of frequency distribution tables, graphs and pie charts. Data from the interview schedules was analysed qualitatively. The study findings revealed that majority (69.1%) of the students in public primary schools in Eldoret Municipality enjoyed learning Life Skills Education. This shows that students had a positive attitude towards learning of life skills education. In addition, it emerged that majority of the teachers believed that Life Skill Education was necessary for primary school children. It was therefore recommended that there is need to make its teaching and learning compulsory to all students as it contributes to personal and social development of a child at an early stage. Similarly, for teachers to develop an interest in teaching of LSE, there is need for them to be trained on LSE.

Keywords: Attitudes, Eldoret Kenya, Life Skills Education, Public Primary Schools, Pupils., Teachers

Peer Influence and Parental Neglect as Predictors of Tantrum Behaviour among Pupils with Dyscalculia in Benin Edo State (Published)

When pupils with learning disability are confronted with academic challenges they cannot comprehend, they often become frustrated, confused and helpless. This development could make them express low self-esteem, be anxious and throw tantrums. This characterizes the behaviour of pupils experiencing learning disability in Mathematics (dyscalculia). Therefore, this study investigated peer influence and parental neglect as predictors of tantrum behaviour among children with dyscalculia in Benin Edo State Nigeria. Through the use of descriptive survey research design, two research questions were answered and data collected from one hundred and sixty randomly selected primary six pupils in twenty randomly selected public schools in Benin City. Using their Mathematics cumulative cognitive scores of three consecutive examination records and two validated instruments, analysis of data was done using the multiple regression statistical tools. The result revealed that peer influence and parental neglect made a joint contribution of 23% variance on tantrum behaviour among pupils with dyscalculia. The result of the study further revealed that peer influence and parental neglect has predictive influence on tantrum behaviour of dyscalculia pupils. Therefore it was recommended that teachers should use teaching methods that would take care of pupil’s individual differences. Through this measure, pupils with learning disability in mathematics would be able to rediscover their potentials and ability to succeed in school.

 

Keywords: Dyscalculia, Parental Neglect, Peer Influence, Pupils., Tantrum Behaviour and School

ASSESSMENT IN PRIMARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS CLASSROOMS IN NIGERIA (Published)

The focus of this study is to determine the proportion of Nigerian Primary School teachers that use the various assessment instruments in the assessment of pupils in mathematics; the sources from which teachers generate their mathematics test items; the levels of questions set by the teachers on the Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive domains; the extent to which Primary School teachers validate their test instruments; how the teachers utilise the outcomes of the formative tests in schools; and problems faced by the teachers in the assessment processes in primary schools. The research design for this study was the survey research design. One hundred and Fifty primary school teachers were sampled from Ebonyi State of Nigeria through purposive sampling technique. There were made up of 108 females and 42 males. The main instrument used for the data collection was a Mathematics Assessment Construction Scale (MACS) questionnaire designed to elicit responses from the subjects in the areas of assessment instruments, source of test items, levels of cognitive domain covered by the questions, validation and item analyses. Other areas covered are the use of formative tests and problems of assessing pupils in primary school mathematics. The questionnaire consists of 23 questions on a four point likert scale using never, not often, often and very often. The split half method was used to establish a reliability coefficient of 0.79. Simple frequency counts and percentages were used to analyse the data and answer the research questions. Results of the study showed that most of the teachers often written tests(100%) and assignments(88%).Group work(76%) very few of them use observation(30%), oral examination(6%) and peer group assessment(8%); 74% of the teachers source their assessment questions from textbook publisher’s questions, 76%  construct their questions and very few of them source their questions from past questions(32%) and question and answer books(30%); most of the teachers set questions covering knowledge(100%), comprehension and application(88%) while only 38% of them set questions on real life problems; 82% of the teachers often carry out content validity of the test instruments and very few teachers carry out reliability test(4%), item difficulties(10%) and item discrimination power(24%); most of the teachers give formative test and feedback to pupils while  only 52% of the teachers often give remediation lessons to the pupils. Some of the problems identified include absenteeism, lateness and truancy of pupils, lack of interest by pupils, lack of materials, lack of knowledge about assessment by teachers etc. It was recommended that teachers should be encouraged to use variety of assessment instruments; teachers should be retrained on the techniques of test construction, and be encouraged to set questions on real life problems.

Keywords: Assessment Instruments, Assessment in Mathematics, Primary schools., Pupils.