Tag Archives: Processing

Business Intelligence System Strategies and Organizational Success in Public Hospitals in Rivers State, Nigeria (Published)

This paper examined business intelligence System strategies and organizational success of public hospitals in Rivers State, Nigeria.  The objective was to investigate the relationship between data mining, Online Analytical Processing, Querying System, Report System and organizational success of the public hospitals in Rivers State. Primary data were sourced from a sample size of two hundred and thirty four medical personnel. The test for the internal consistency of the instrument was conducted using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient (r) which yielded a reliability index of 0.89. Mean and standard deviation were used to examine the extent to which business intelligence affect performance; Spearman’s rank order correlation coefficient was used to test the null hypotheses. The findings of this study found data mining, online analytical processing, querying systems and reporting systems significantly relate to the success of public hospitals in Rivers State; there is a significant relationship data mining, online analytical processing, querying systems, reporting systems and quick decision making as well as time saving, significantly moderates relationship between business intelligence systems and organizational success in public hospitals in Rivers State. The study therefore conclude that business intelligence have significant effect on performance of the hospitals. We   recommend    that federal and state government should overhaul the health services and bring them into the mainstream of business intelligence scheme.

Keywords: Business Intelligence, Organizational Success, Processing, Public Hospitals, Querying System

Business Benefit Concerns of Women Processors of African Locust Bean Seeds for Poverty Reduction in Enugu State-Nigeria (Published)

The study was carried out to find solution to the business benefit concern of women processors of African locust bean seeds for poverty reduction in Enugu state-Nigeria. Three research questions guided the study. Survey and Quasi-experimental design was adopted by the study. The sample for the study was 326 made up of customers from Ogbete (150), Obollo-afor (80 and Ogige (96) markets all in Enugu state. The instruments for data collection were interview schedule, counterfactual questionnaire items, interest inventory and experimental records. Data were collected by the researchers with the help of two assistants selected based on their familiarity with the study area and ability to interpret the questionnaire items in local dialects of the respondents. Percentage was used for quality analysis of the interview schedule (phase 1A), mean was used to answer research questions one (phase 1B) and three while market record was used to answer research question two. The study found out that customers rejected machine processed locust bean because of sour taste, low keeping quality and contamination among others. The study also showed that when the limitations of machine processed locust bean were eliminated through experiment, customers’ demand for the product increased which was indicated by the interest inventory data. The study therefore recommended that workshop should be organized at the local levels by extension officers for re-training of women processors and machine operators using the identified steps in the experimented processing of locust bean seeds to help overcome the business concerns of the women for poverty reduction in the Enugu state.

 

Keywords: Business, Poverty, Processing, counterfactual factors, locust bean

Some Physical and Frictional Properties of Dikanut (Irvingia Wombolu) As a Function of Moisture Content. (Published)

Some physical and frictional properties of Dikanut (Irvingia wombolu) were evaluated as a function of moisture content varying from 7.02% to 15.04% (dry basis). Regression models were equally developed to these effects. All properties studied were found to have a polynomial response to moisture content increase within the moisture content range studied (7.02% to 15.04% dry basis). The kernel dimensions increased from 44.00 to 47.73mm, 33.50 to 34.89mm, 20.60 to 21.79mm and 32.20 to 33.73mm for major, intermediate, minor and equivalent diameters respectively as moisture content increased. The kernel volume and surface area increased from 120.01mm3 to 158.56mm3 and 102.04mm2 to 131.64mm2. Bulk density and true density increased from 3.64g/cm3 to 4.33g/cm3, and 10.31g/cm3 to 12.26g/cm3 respectively with increase in the moisture content range tested. Aspect ratio and sphericity and porosity increased from 0.74 to 0.79; 0.70 to 0.72; 0.41 to 0.60 respectively within the moisture content range studied. Angle of repose increased from 20.10 ̊ to 37.20 ̊ while static coefficient of friction increased from 0.60 to 0.92 (plywood), 0.50 to 0.82 (mild steel), 0.37 to 0.70 (aluminum), 0.30 to 0.64 (plastic) as moisture content increased from 7.02 to 15.04% (dry basis) with plywood giving the highest range of values. The relevant data obtained for this variety would be useful for design and development of machines and equipment for processing and handling operations.

Keywords: Dikanut, Moisture Content, Physical Properties, Postharvest, Processing

Effects of Various Processing Methods of Ripe and Unripe Plantain Diets on Blood Glucose Level (Published)

Ripe and unripe plantain was processed by frying, roasting and boiling. 30 human volunteers consumed individually 161g of different plantain diets prepared equivalent to 50g available carbohydrate or glucose after 10-12 hours over night fast. The venous blood samples were drawn at 30 minutes intervals for 2 hours after fasting blood glucose test. Using the glucose oxidase method, the blood glucose levels after feeding were determined. The areas under curve were calculated by trapezoid method. The glycemic index values for ripe plantain were found to be 56,54 and 55 for fried, boiled and roasted respectively while the glycemic indices for unripe plantain diets where 46, 44 and 46. For fried, boiled and roasted respectively. There were significant differences (P <0.05) in the glycemic indices of ripe and unripe plantain diets although both ripe and unripe plantain diets are within the low glycemic index range. Looking at the different processing methods the results of this study suggest that boiled unripe plantain has more promising control effect on blood glucose level and better glycemic control in carbohydrate related metabolic disorders than other processing methods.

Keywords: Blood glucose, Glycemic index, Plantain diets, Processing

Effects of Various Processing Methods of Ripe and Unripe Plantain Diets on Blood Glucose Level (Published)

Ripe and unripe plantain was processed by frying, roasting and boiling. 30 human volunteers consumed individually 161g of different plantain diets prepared equivalent to 50g available carbohydrate or glucose after 10-12 hours over night fast. The venous blood samples were drawn at 30 minutes intervals for 2 hours after fasting blood glucose test. Using the glucose oxidase method, the blood glucose levels after feeding were determined. The areas under curve were calculated by trapezoid method. The glycemic index values for ripe plantain were found to be 56,54 and 55 for fried, boiled and roasted respectively while the glycemic indices for unripe plantain diets where 46, 44 and 46. For fried, boiled and roasted respectively. There were significant differences (P <0.05) in the glycemic indices of ripe and unripe plantain diets although both ripe and unripe plantain diets are within the low glycemic index range. Looking at the different processing methods the results of this study suggest that boiled unripe plantain has more promising control effect on blood glucose level and better glycemic control in carbohydrate related metabolic disorders than other processing methods

Keywords: Blood glucose, Glycemic index, Plantain diets, Processing