Tag Archives: Poultry manure

Influence of Poultry Manure on Phosphate Fertilizer Need of Soybean (Glycine Max Merill (L) In Some Selected Alfisols in Benue State. (Published)

Laboratory and pot experiments were carried out at the University of Agriculture Makurdi to determine the influence of poultry manure on the Phosphate fertilizer need of soybean in some selected Alfisols in Benue State. Surface soil samples (0 – 20 cm) were collected from three locations in Benue State (Daudu, TseKough and Ayange) and Poultry manure sourced from the University of Agriculture Makurdi Livestock Teaching and Research Farm. The physical and chemical properties of the soils and poultry manure were determined using standard procedures. Four (4) Kg of soils were weighed into perforated plastic pots of 5 litres capacity,Six levels of solution P concentrations (0, 0.150, 0.175, 0.20, 0.225, 0.250 mg l-1), 2 levels of poultry manure (0 and 6 t ha-1) and three soils factorially combined constituted the experimental treatments and were arranged in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replications. Soybean seeds of the variety TGX 1935-3F were planted and grown to maturity. Optimal P solution concentrations for soybeans production on these soils were 0.2 mg l-1for Daudu, 0.225 mg l-1for TseKough while Ayange required 0.175 mg l-1. The amounts of phosphate fertilizer required to achieve this solution concentrations (SPR) were 204 Kg P ha-1 for Daudu, 223.32 kg P ha-1 and 136.55 Kg P ha-1 for TseKough and Ayange respectively. However with the addition of poultry manure the SPR for Daudu was 165.89 kg P ha-1, 185.04 kg P ha-1 for TseKough and 111.03 kg P ha-1 for Ayange representing 18.75 %, 17.14 % and 18.69 % reduction in SPR respectively.

Keywords: Alfisols, Availability, Phosphorus, Poultry manure, Standard phosphate concentration, Standard phosphate requirement

Controlling Poultry House Ammonia Emmissions Using Gas Permeable Membrane Systems (Published)

An experiment was conducted to investigate the use of gas-permeable membrane systems to capture and recover ammonia from poultry houses. The objectives of the experiment were: 1) to evaluate the performance of two gas-permeable membrane ammonia-capturing system models and 2) to assess ammonia emission impact on birds’ mortality, and to investigate the relationship between birds age and ammonia emission in rooms equipped with and without these systems. The systems were developed and placed inside a 6.0 m X 6.0 m room in a research poultry house.  The systems were started by preparing 5N sulfuric acid in an acid tank and a pH 1 solution in a concentration tank. Acids were added to the concentration tank manually to achieve a pH of 2.0, and then the pH pump controller and the membrane circulation modules were used to bring the pH back to 1. After NH3 gas passed through the membrane and was in contact with the acidic solution, ammonium (NH4+) salt was formed, which was retained and concentrated in the acidic solution. The experiment consisted of two treatments namely: 1) Control (room without membrane systems (RWOMS), and 2) treatment (room with both membrane systems (RWMS). Each room contained 400 birds. The results demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) difference of air ammonia concentration between rooms and from poultry litter. Among the membrane systems, tubular membrane system had the greatest mean NH4+ recovery compared to the flat membrane system. The difference was highly significant (p<0.01). Birds’ mortality rate was decreased by ~46.6% in room with the installed systems indicating that reduced ammonia resulted in improved bird survival. The findings of this study indicate that the membrane systems can be an effect method of reducing ammonia concentration in poultry houses with an added advantage of retaining ammonium salt has plant food. 

Keywords: Ammonia, Ammonium, Gas‐Permeable Membrane, Poultry manure, Sulfuric Acid

Comparative Effects of Poultry Manure and NPK Rates on Sunflower (Helianthus Annuus L.) Production in Rivers State, Southern Rainforest, Nigeria (Published)

A 2 x 4 x 3  rain fed factorial experiment arranged in a randomized complete block design, was carried out to compare the effects of poultry manure [PM] with N.P.K. (15:15:15) rates on sunflower in rivers state, southern rainforest of Nigeria. PM and NPK rates were 0, 5, 10, and 20g per seedling per pot. Data collected were plant height [at; 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks after planting (WAP)]; number of leaves, leaf area (LA) at 6 WAP; head diameter, head weight, number of seeds per head and seed weight at harvest. Results show that  NPK initially produced taller plants but PM increased growth rate  with time over NPK.  PM at 5, 10 and 20 g produced taller sunflower plants at 10 WAP over NPK rates. There was no significant difference in the number of leaves between plants that received PM and NPK, though NPK influenced higher LA.   Head diameter, head weight and seed weight increased with doses of both fertilizers, 20 g PM produced sunflower plants with the widest diameter and weightiest seeds.  While number of seeds increased with PM rates, the highest number of seeds with NPK application was at 5 g application. This was still lower than the highest number of seeds produced by sunflower plants fertilized with 20 g PM.  Application of 20 g PM produced plants with highest growth rate, wider head diameter, highest number and seed weight. Twenty (20 g) PM application rate per seedling is recommended for Sunflower production in southern rainforest, Nigeria.  A further study on higher PM levels is also recommended.

Keywords: Nigeria, Poultry manure, Southern Rainforest, sunflower

Efficacy of Combining Varietal Resistance with Organic Fertilizer Application in Reducing Infestation of Cucumber (Cucumis Sativus L.) By Insect Pests in the Niger Delta (Published)

Efficacy of combining varietal resistance with organic fertilizer application in reducing infestation of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) by insect pests was studied during the early cropping season of 2013 at the Teaching and Research Farm, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt located in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Three varieties of C. sativus (Starke ayres, Bakker brother and Griffaton) were used for the experiment. Poultry manure (PM) was applied at four rates (4.2t/ha, 8.3t/ha, 16.7t//ha and 33.3t/ha); an inorganic fertilizer NPK 15:15:15 was applied at the recommended rate (0.3t/ha) and a control plot was also included. The fertilizers were broadcast and mixed thoroughly with soil to ensure even distribution as soon as the beds were ready and PM was allowed to cure for 14 days before sowing the cucumber seeds. Plant spacing of 50cm x 50cm and planting depth of 2-3cm were adopted with 20 plants sown per plot. The experiential land area was 18m x 14m and each treatment plot measured 2.0m x 1.5m. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) and each treatment was replicated three times. Parameters studied included days to 50% germination and flowering, number of undamaged and damaged fruits and their corresponding weights and insects which were collected each week for three consecutive weeks (HVT 1, HVT 2 and HVT 3, respectively). The insect species were mainly in the order Coleoptera followed by Diptera, Homoptera and Orthoptera in a decreasing order. The major species collected were Epilachna chrysomellina F., Cheilomenes sulphurea Oliv., Kanahiiphaga aeneipenni Lab., Aulacopora vinula Eric., Aulacophora africana Weise, and Dinorettix africana Bol. Others included Lagria villosa F., Diopsis sp., Locris erythromela Walker, Chrysolagria sp., Lema calcrata Dalm., Planiseta sp., Coenochilus nr ventricosus Gyril, and Monolepta nigeriae Bryant. Organic manure (PM) or inorganic fertilizer (NPK 15:15:15) had no significant effect on days to 50% germination and flowering. Poultry manure applied at the rate of 33.3t/ha increased the number both of the undamaged and damaged fruits and their corresponding weights followed by plots treated with 16.7t/ha PM and the least number of fruits and weights were recorded in untreated plots (control). Higher numbers of insect pests were collected from C. sativus treated with 33.3t/ha PM and NPK. Stark ayres variety treated with 33.3t/ha PM had the highest number of fruits (155.85g) followed by Bakker brother treated with 16.7t/ha PM (142.89g) and the least was recorded in Griffaton variety that received no treatment (control). Fruit weight and number were in the order harvest 2> harvest 1> harvest 3 (HVT2>HVT1>HVT3). The study suggests that fertilizer application may lead to increased crop productivity but it may also intensify pest infestation in cultivated cucumber.

Keywords: Cucumber, Cucumis Sativus, Infestation, Insect pests, Poultry manure

Influence of Poultry Manure on Phosphate Fertilizer Need of Soybean (Glycine Max Merill (L) In Some Selected Alfisols in Benue State (Published)

Laboratory and pot experiments were carried out at the University of Agriculture Makurdi to determine the influence of poultry manure on the Phosphate fertilizer need of soybean in some selected Alfisols in Benue State. Surface soil samples (0 – 20 cm) were collected from three locations in Benue State (Daudu, TseKough and Ayange) and Poultry manure sourced from the University of Agriculture Makurdi Livestock Teaching and Research Farm. The physical and chemical properties of the soils and poultry manure were determined using standard procedures. Four (4) Kg of soils were weighed into perforated plastic pots of 5 litres capacity,Six levels of solution P concentrations (0, 0.150, 0.175, 0.20, 0.225, 0.250 mg l-1), 2 levels of poultry manure (0 and 6 t ha-1) and three soils factorially combined constituted the experimental treatments and were arranged in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replications. Soybean seeds of the variety TGX 1935-3F were planted and grown to maturity. Optimal P solution concentrations for soybeans production on these soils were 0.2 mg l-1for Daudu, 0.225 mg l-1for TseKough while Ayange required 0.175 mg l-1. The amounts of phosphate fertilizer required to achieve this solution concentrations (SPR) were 204 Kg P ha-1 for Daudu, 223.32 kg P ha-1 and 136.55 Kg P ha-1 for TseKough and Ayange respectively. However with the addition of poultry manure the SPR for Daudu was 165.89 kg P ha-1, 185.04 kg P ha-1 for TseKough and 111.03 kg P ha-1 for Ayange representing 18.75 %, 17.14 % and 18.69 % reduction in SPR respectively.

Keywords: Alfisols, Availability, Phosphorus, Poultry manure, Standard phosphate concentration, Standard phosphate requirement

Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Yield and Economic Return of Acha (Digitaria Spp) Varieties in Lafia, Nigeria (Published)

These studies were conducted at the Teaching and Research farm, College of Agriculture, Lafia, Nasarawa State, Nigeria during the wet seasons of 2013 and 2014. To determine the effect of poultry manure and NPK fertilizer on growth and grain yield of Acha varieties and profit margin for using these inputs in Lafia, Nasarawa state, Nigeria. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design, replicated three times. The results showed that application of poultry and NPK fertilizer rates significantly enhance growth parameters in both two seasons. 10/ha of poultry manure and 120kg/ha of NPK produced plants with highest number of tillers (12.93 and 13.24); whil  D. eburua variety produced the tallest plant (14.78 and 16.24) in both years. Application of 10t/ha of poultry manure produced the highest grain weight of 0.98t/ha and 1.27t/ha; while NPK fertilizer rate at 120kg/ha also produced the highest grain weight of 1t/ha and 1.21t/ha in both years. All these grain weight are statistically at par with application of 5t/ha of poultry manure and 60kg/ha of NPK fertilizer, but lower than the control in both years. Varieties also had a significant effect on the grain yield of Acha. Digitaria exilis proved its superiority agains D. eburua by producing the highest grain weight of 1.31t/ha and 1.52t/ha in both years. Interaction between poultry manure and NPK did not produce ant significant effect on the grain weight of acha in both years. The total revenue (TR) under organic manure was N54,775.00 and N54,950.00 under inorganic (NPK) fertilizer. The gross margin (GM) was estimated to be N27,575 and N25,900.00 under organic manure and inorganic fertilizer respectively. Various ratios calculated gave a positive value which shows that Acha production in the area is viable and profitable.

Keywords: Acha, Economic return, Fertilizer, NPK, Poultry manure