Tag Archives: Potable Water

ACCESS TO POTABLE WATER IN IKEJI ARAKEJI: IT’S IMPACT ON HUMAN HEALTH (Published)

The research is aim at the Source of Portable Water in Ikeji, Its Effects on Human Health and Solving Problems related to it. Based on a detailed review a few research questions were raised and answered. The study adopted the description research design and a reasonable number of   Ikeji indigenes. The main research instrument was the use of questionnaires for the data collection and simple percentage used in analyzing the data collected. The findings from the research analysis show that the access to portable water for the Ikeji indigenes was rain water, well water, water from the local stream and river and pipe borne water. Inspite of some of the problems encountered by the indigenes like impurity of the water, they still use the water. Based on this, it has been recommended that government make available other sources, and here are also suggestions for further studies attached to this study.

Keywords: Human Health, Ikeji Arakeji, Potable Water

TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE ALLOCATION OF POTABLE WATER IN GHANA: EVIDENCE FROM KUMASI (Published)

The provision of potable water for human sustenance both now and in the future is one of the most critical issues in the world today. This paper sought to assess the sustainability of potable water distribution in Ghana through the Contingent Valuation Method in Kumasi, Ghana’s second largest urban centre. Willingness-to-pay values were elicited by means of a bidding game technique through administered questionnaire to communities in Kumasi, where potable water supply was either non-existent or very irregular. The analysis shows that Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL) could increase current tariffs by about 300% without hurting consumers, since, that would rather increase welfare considerably and facilitate sustainable allocation of potable water. A sizeable consumers’ surplus exists, which is an indication of households being susceptible to extortion by water vendors. This requires urgent government intervention to save some poor residents of Kumasi from undue exploitation as well as the return to the consumption of unwholesome water that would increase pressure on medical and Health Insurance resources.

Keywords: Consumers’ Surplus, Ghana, Potable Water, Welfare, Willingness to pay