Tag Archives: Political Leadership

Perceptions, Challenges and Coping Strategies of Women in Political Leadership Positions (Published)

This study examined the experiences of females in political leadership positions in the Sunyani West District. Qualitative approach was adopted with a case study design to explore the experiences of the women leaders. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used to select 14 participants comprising eight (8) political party executives, four (4) Assembly women and two (2) women who were parliamentary candidates. The data were collected using interview and analysed through thematic procedure. The findings indicated that females in political leadership positions perceive leadership in three different ways as task-oriented, goal-oriented and people-oriented. Whatever way they perceived political leadership; they faced several challenges related to their personal lives, family and community. However, the main challenge facing females in political leadership positions in Sunyani West District is misconceptions about their capabilities as females. Females in political leadership positions cope with their challenges through self-motivation, creation of cordial relationship with male chauvinists and concentration on their potentials. The study recommended that female political leaders should focus on their output and achievements to show their capabilities in contributing meaningfully to society. There is an urgent need for opinion leaders such as chiefs, queen mothers, district chief executives and the public in general to discourage the unfair, unjust and unequal treatment sometimes meted out to women who occupy political leadership positions.

Keywords: Challenges, Coping Strategies, Ghana, Leadership, Political Leadership, Politics, Women

Political Leadership and Policy Decisions in Africa: A Critical Reflection on Policies in Education and Employment in Ghana. (Published)

Since colonial times, governments in Ghana have inherited political power with different development plans, owned by the government and amended by the incoming one when its predecessor leaves power. Article 35(7) of the Directive Principle of State Policy in Ghana states that “[A]s far as practicable, a government shall continue and execute projects and programmes commenced by the previous Governments.” This provision is supported by both the National Development Planning Commission Act and the National Development Planning Act to strengthen the role of the National Development Planning Commission which oversees the broader implementation of development strategies in the country. The analysis in this paper is influenced by interviews conducted with officials of the Ministry of Education in Ghana, the Ghana Education Service, selected heads and teachers of sampled secondary schools, as well as parents. A total of twenty (20) respondents were purposively sampled and interviewed. The analysis of the primary data was supported by other secondary sources including peer-reviewed journal articles, books and reports of educational development in Ghana. The results indicate the utter disregard for the provisions in both educational and employment policies and strategies in the country and its associated consequence on the purse of the public and general development of the state. The paper concludes that the apparent lack of consistency, over-politicization and the piecemeal attitude with which Ghanaian political leaders implement important national development policies may be mitigated by the adoption of development strategies that are national in character rather than government-specific and these strategies should be binding on all successive governments and geared towards an accelerated growth at all levels in the country

Keywords: Educational Policy, Employment Policy, Governance in Africa, Political Leadership, Public Policy

The Collapse of Probity and Good Governance in Nigeria: The Bureaucracy Discharged But Not Acquitted (Published)

It is fifty-four years since the British colonial overlords departed Nigerian geo-political space living the stage for indigenous rulers. Fifty four years of independence provides opportunity for discourse, on good governance as Nigeria features prominently in the crises in Africa. Literature is awash with prognoses on the probable causes of this parlous state. There is a growing consensus that lack of probity and accountability are responsible for the appalling governance situation in Africa. Scholars in Nigeria taking a cue from polemics on politics and administration dichotomy and its dialectics in the western hemisphere have been arguing about the helplessness of public administration in Nigeria’s crisis of governance. Tracing the history of Nigeria’s political leadership and its bureaucracy, the paper provides a descriptive analysis of the crisis in Nigeria within the context of the nature of political leadership (colonial, post-colonial, military and civilian) and argues that neither Nigerian political leadership nor the bureaucracy are blameless using the theoretical stand-points of structural/functionalism and elitism especially in view of the influential role the bureaucracy had opportunity to play during the inexperienced three decades of military rule out of Nigeria’s five decades of independence. Recommendations include: a coherent and comprehensive bureaucratic reform that will wean the Nigerian public service from western-inspired top-down development paradigm to bottom-up approach; that there should be social re-orientation designed to eschew primordial values that promote nepotism and mediocrity; that merit should not be sacrificed on the altar of “sense of self-belonging” in Nigerian federation; and that Max Weber bureaucratic model should be adapted to grass-roots participatory governance.

Keywords: Bureaucracy, Governance, Political Leadership, Probity

THE COLLAPSE OF PROBITY AND GOOD GOVERNANCE IN NIGERIA- THE BUREAUCRACY DISCHARGED BUT NOT ACQUITTED (Published)

: It is fifty-four years since the British colonial overlords departed Nigerian geo-political space living the stage for indigenous rulers. Fifty four years of independence provides opportunity for discourse, on good governance as Nigeria features prominently in the crises in Africa. Literature is awash with prognoses on the probable causes of this parlous state. There is a growing consensus that lack of probity and accountability are responsible for the appalling governance situation in Africa. Scholars in Nigeria taking a cue from polemics on politics and administration dichotomy and its dialectics in the western hemisphere have been arguing about the helplessness of public administration in Nigeria’s crisis of governance. Tracing the history of Nigeria’s political leadership and its bureaucracy, the paper provides a descriptive analysis of the crisis in Nigeria within the context of the nature of political leadership (colonial, post-colonial, military and civilian) and argues that neither Nigerian political leadership nor the bureaucracy are blameless using the theoretical stand-points of structural/functionalism and elitism especially in view of the influential role the bureaucracy had opportunity to play during the inexperienced three decades of military rule out of Nigeria’s five decades of independence. Recommendations include: a coherent and comprehensive bureaucratic reform that will wean the Nigerian public service from western-inspired top-down development paradigm to bottom-up approach; that there should be social re-orientation designed to eschew primordial values that promote nepotism and mediocrity; that merit should not be sacrificed on the altar of “sense of self-belonging” in Nigerian federation; and that Max Weber bureaucratic model should be adapted to grass-roots participatory governance

Keywords: Bureaucracy, Governance, Political Leadership, Probity

POLITICAL LEADERSHIP CRISIS AND FAILED STATES: THE FUNCTION OF FAMILY IMAGINATION (Published)

The penury in the midst of plenty that pervade the walls of many African states is a perplexing paradox that begs for a critical evaluation.  That most African failed states are richly endowed is a common cliché albeit a truthful one. But that penury is highest in Africa is indicative of the impact of corruption on the plenty present within the state- ‘with an average per capital income of roughly US one dollar a day,  part of  Africa remains the poorest in the world.’ Cursory survey reveals that the tempo of corruption in Africa is becoming a cultural phenomenon. In a country like Nigeria, it holds true that the spread of corruption extends to even the little infants in primary school. This paper postulates that even the most primary agent of socialization the family is not speared the marauding finger of corruption. Could Nigerian family system socialize the infant into a corrupt mentality? This paper therefore, interrogates the relationship between the family pattern of behavior especially with regard to sharing of resources and communication to pattern of leadership in some African countries (especially Nigeria) and how this debilitating framework has often been transposed as paradigms for the state leadership. More often than not, the breadwinner enjoys the best part of the share; could such pattern translate to a leadership pattern of demagogues? Operating through the prism of George Larkoff, Albert Bandura and Jean Piaget, the paper proposes that the family pattern of sharing and communication prepares the child for a pattern of leadership that is highly self-serving. Therefore, the fight against corruption in Africa must go back to addressing pattern of family sharing and communication

Keywords: Crisis, Family Imagination, Political Leadership