Tag Archives: Perceptions

Perceptions of Academic Staff Members on Factors of Capacity Building in Ghanaian Polytechnics (Published)

This article, which reports on a doctoral research project, explores the perceptions of academic staff on factors of capacity building with special reference to Ghanaian polytechnics, where the institutions are facing unprecedented capacity building challenges. A convenience sample of 1026 academic staff members were drawn from a population of 2575 permanent lecturers in the ten polytechnics. Data were collected through a questionnaire constructed by the researchers. Data collected were subjected to statistical analysis with the use of descriptive statistics, ANOVA and Population t-test. The study found that the factors that affect capacity building of academic staff include institutional training and development; performance and professional development; academic competence; and learning and developmental environment. The study further identified some capacity building gaps in the polytechnics. However, there is no significant difference between male and female lecturers’ perception on capacity building in the polytechnics. Lecturers’ perception on capacity building is also significantly high with respect to the identified factors and that significant differences exist between the demographic (designation) groups and the identified factors. The study concludes that building the capacity of academic staff is critical to successful teaching and learning and that capacity building should be the starting point for the on-going transformation in Ghanaian polytechnics. It therefore recommends that policy makers in Ghana be urgently spurred into devising important strategies that would proactively respond to the current capacity-building challenges in the institutions. Moving forward, a context-responsive areas of strategic intervention vis à vis capacity building of academic staff are proposed.

Keywords: Capacity building, Ghanaian polytechnics, Perceptions, academic competence, staff development; institutional training

Practitioner-Patient Relationship: An Evaluation of Perceptions in Ghana (Published)

The relationship between health practitioners and their clients is central to the practice of healthcare as well as essential to the delivery of quality diagnosis and treatment of diseases. It forms one of the foundations of modern-day healthcare ethics; thus, a keystone of general healthcare. As expected of medical practitioners to maintain a serene and professional rapport with clients, support clients’ dignity, and respect their position in the continuous development of health care, patients, on the other hand, are also anticipated not to annihilate this relationship. In Ghana, for instance, this relationship seems not to have obtained absolute appreciation, thereby hindering its helpful effects on healthcare delivery in general. As its purpose, the paper evaluates knowledge and perceptions concerning patient-practitioner relationship in Ghana to understand the context within which this relationship operates. This research -conducted in 2 districts in the Ashanti region of Ghana -involved a sample size of 300 respondents (78 healthcare professionals from 13 health institutions and 222 clients). A systematic search with questionnaires and interviews as research tools were used in gathering data. Respondents (over 85 per cent) exhibited a higher level of knowledge as regards health professional-patient relationship. Respondents were, however, divided as to whether or not this relationship was a positive one in their respective health centres. While some respondents (mostly health personnel) believed that the relationship was cordial, others (mostly patients) taught otherwise. This research is made relevant since there is considerable curative power in proper alliance between patients and health practitioners

Keywords: Evaluation, Health Care Practitioner, Patient., Perceptions, Relationship

Evaluating the Awareness and Perceptions of English Teachers in using E-Learning Tools for Teaching in Saudi High Schools (Published)

The study was carried out to evaluate English teachers’ awareness and perceptions in using e-learning tools. In this study, a total of 22 English teachers from Yanbu educational department participated in the online survey. The majority of the participants (77.3%) are male. Different e-learning parameters were measured like; skill in using educational technology, teachers’ personal use of technology, type of technology used in the classroom, e-learning confidence, barriers to e-learning, perceived effectiveness of e-learning, and willingness to adopt e-learning tools for teaching. The result of the study showed that English teachers are aware and familiar with popular e-learning tools and perceived its usefulness in teaching and learning. Moreover, teachers were faced with some barriers that prevent them to employ technology in the classroom like; lack of reliable Internet connectivity, lack of training, inadequate devices for both teachers and students, and shortage of class time needed to integrate technology in classroom. The study recommends among other things to provide training programs, workshops and seminars to improve teachers’ skills in integrating technology. Furthermore, it suggest to equip schools with a reliable Internet connectivity and technology devices and to provide teachers with enough time to prepare for using e-learning tools.

Keywords: E-Learning Tools, English Teachers, Perceptions, Saudi Arabia, awareness

Perceptions on the Commercialisation of the Malu: A Case of Samoa (Published)

The art of Samoan tattooing or Tatau has been widely researched by scholars. Most scholarly, medical and artistic studies examine Samoan tattooing with greater interest on the male tattoo (pe’a) while the female tattoo (malu) is insignificantly explored. Traditionally, the malu was reserved for the taupou, (the daughters of high chiefs). Today, no such reservation seems to be in place and pretty much any woman or girl, Samoan, part Samoan or non Samoan may receive a malu provided they can afford the costs and tolerate the pain. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu are deeply debated and vigorously contested on social media and online discussion forums. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu from Samoans and non Samoans residing in Samoa are nonexistent in academia. This research paper presents the results of a small scale study that investigated the perceptions of Samoans, part Samoan and non Samoans living in Samoa on the commercialisation of the malu. The paper intends to highlight similarities and differences in perceptions amongst participants living in Samoa and bloggers residing outside of Samoa. The paper presents a number of interesting themes drawn from the study on the commercialisation of the malu.

Keywords: Commercialization, Malu, Online Discussion Forums, Perceptions, Samoan Tattooing, Social media, Tatau

Perceptions on the Commercialisation of the Malu: A Case of Samoa (Published)

The art of Samoan tattooing or Tatau has been widely researched by scholars. Most scholarly, medical and artistic studies examine Samoan tattooing with greater interest on the male tattoo (pe’a) while the female tattoo (malu) is insignificantly explored. Traditionally, the malu was reserved for the taupou, (the daughters of high chiefs). Today, no such reservation seems to be in place and pretty much any woman or girl, Samoan, part Samoan or non Samoan may receive a malu provided they can afford the costs and tolerate the pain. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu are deeply debated and vigorously contested on social media and online discussion forums. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu from Samoans and non Samoans residing in Samoa are nonexistent in academia. This research paper presents the results of a small scale study that investigated the perceptions of Samoans, part Samoan and non Samoans living in Samoa on the commercialisation of the malu. The paper intends to highlight similarities and differences in perceptions amongst participants living in Samoa and bloggers residing outside of Samoa. The paper presents a number of interesting themes drawn from the study on the commercialisation of the malu.

Keywords: Commercialisation, Malu, Online Discussion Forums, Perceptions, Samoan Tattooing, Social media, Tatau

Perceptions on the Commercialisation of the Malu: A Case of Samoa (Published)

The art of Samoan tattooing or Tatau has been widely researched by scholars. Most scholarly, medical and artistic studies examine Samoan tattooing with greater interest on the male tattoo (pe’a) while the female tattoo (malu) is insignificantly explored. Traditionally, the malu was reserved for the taupou, (the daughters of high chiefs). Today, no such reservation seems to be in place and pretty much any woman or girl, Samoan, part Samoan or non Samoan may receive a malu provided they can afford the costs and tolerate the pain. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu are deeply debated and vigorously contested on social media and online discussion forums. Perceptions on the commercialisation of the malu from Samoans and non Samoans residing in Samoa are nonexistent in academia. This research paper presents the results of a small scale study that investigated the perceptions of Samoans, part Samoan and non Samoans living in Samoa on the commercialisation of the malu. The paper intends to highlight similarities and differences in perceptions amongst participants living in Samoa and bloggers residing outside of Samoa. The paper presents a number of interesting themes drawn from the study on the commercialisation of the malu.

Keywords: Commercialization, Malu, Online Discussion Forums, Perceptions, Samoan Tattooing, Social media, Tatau

PHILOSOPHICAL PERCEPTIONS OF SUICIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SANCTITY OF LIFE (Published)

The sanctity of human life is commonly adjudged as placing great moral burden on man. On this premise, some philosophers opined that man has no right to terminate his life. While others argued that having received life as a gift, man has the right to reject the gift when he perceives that there is no value in remaining alive. This could be due to grave illness or other forms of dissatisfaction. There are various arguments presented both in favour and against suicide by these proponents. Notable among the protagonists are some philosophers. The study therefore, seeks to examine the philosophical perceptions of suicide and implications on the sanctity of human life. The writer applied philosophical, sociological and historical research methodology in his investigation. It is recommended that man should not necessary see suicide as the right option for escaping the vicissitudes of life, which are often likely to confront man. On the other hand, it is a tremendous moral burden on man if he decides to terminate his life since he would be depriving those he could have supported, both financially and morally. The study also recommended that man should uphold the sanctity of life, as life is a gift from God. Man cannot give life and not justified to also take life, the study argued.

Keywords: Life, Perceptions, Philosophical, Sanctity, Suicide