Tag Archives: Literacy

Literacy and Sustainable Health Practices among Pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area Of Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

Literacy has emerged as an approach to achieving the United Nation’s sustainable development Goals (SDGs) on good health and wellbeing for all ages and in all societies. It comes as a core purpose of public health having a far reaching agenda to include school children in order to ensure sustainable health practices within populations. However, literacy on health seems to be inadequate and excludes pupils. The situation poses a risk to the actualisation of the objective on good health and wellbeing in developing societies. This survey was conducted to examine the influence of literacy on sustainable health practices among pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. Leaned onto the social constructivist and social inclusion postulations, three research questions and null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. 200 respondents were randomly selected from the population within the research location. Data was pooled from participants via the literacy acquisition and healthcare practices questionnaire (LHPQ). The Independent t-test statistic was applied to analyse data. Findings showed that functional, interactive and critical literacy have significant influence on sustainable health practices among pupils. The recommendations reflect the adoption of inclusive strategies to enable pupils co-create knowledge and co-partner with adults on health literacy to enhance health practices in the context.

Keywords: Calabar-South, Literacy, Pupils., sustainable health practices

Literacy and Sustainable Health Practices among Pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

Literacy has emerged as an approach to achieving the United Nation’s sustainable development Goals (SDGs) on good health and wellbeing for all ages and in all societies. It comes as a core purpose of public health having a far reaching agenda to include school children in order to ensure sustainable health practices within populations. However, literacy on health seems to be inadequate and excludes pupils. The situation poses a risk to the actualisation of the objective on good health and wellbeing in developing societies. This survey was conducted to examine the influence of literacy on sustainable health practices among pupils in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. Leaned onto the social constructivist and social inclusion postulations, three research questions and null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. 200 respondents were randomly selected from the population within the research location. Data was pooled from participants via the literacy and health practices questionnaire (LHPQ). The Independent t-test statistic was applied to analyse data. Findings showed that functional, interactive and critical literacy have significant influence on sustainable health practices among pupils. The recommendations reflect the adoption of inclusive strategies to enable pupils co-create knowledge and co-partner with adults on health literacy to enhance health practices in the context.

Keywords: Calabar-South, Literacy, Pupils., sustainable health practices

Introducing Teaching Literacy Course: Learning From B.Ed (Hons) Student Teachers Reflections (Published)

The study emphasis on to get reflection of students teachers on a such course which one is introduced first time in teacher training institutes where it makes able to student teachers to teach literacy, develop different skills through theories and practices of teaching to understated the need of subject, It gives many opportunities and makes powerful to leaner with the knowledge. The sample consisted of three institutions where the size of sample is 30 samples, in which 10 sample from each institutes. The results signify that student’s teachers felt in difficulty because of no resources, lengthy courses so it taught by theoretical then practices, faced problems in practicing schools and medium of language. On the base of findings recommendations and conclusion were made that need to concise the course contents and give facilities, resources to teach subjects and use the other language where students feel difficulties, and aware to practicing school teachers for worth of subject. This study also recommended that its defined on specific of area of Sindh have hope other will do a research broader level of Pakistan.

Keywords: Learning Practices, Literacy, Reflections, Student Teachers, Teaching

Language of Instruction in Kenya: Focus On Lower Primary in Schools in Rural Areas (Published)

The use of mother tongue as a language of instruction debate has been ongoing in Kenya as well as in other African countries with no consensus from researchers and policy makers. This paper focuses on the use of mother tongue in lower primary in schools in rural areas in Kenya and the reasons for deviations from guidelines that recommend the use of language of the catchment area in classes 1-3. This paper maintains that the use of mother tongue in the early years of schooling provides basic literacy skills necessary for learning in other subjects. Despite the benefits of use of mother tongue as the language of instruction in lower primary in schools in the rural areas, many primary schools in Kenya hardly use it for instruction. Not only does this paper recommend the use of mother tongue in lower primary in schools in rural areas in Kenya but also proposes that teachers perform the crucial role of enabling parents and other stakeholders in the education sector understand how mother tongue benefits the learner in the teaching learning process.

Keywords: Language of Instruction, Literacy, Mother tongue, Quality of Education, cognitive development, learner participation

Language in Education: Barriers and Bridges (Published)

This article explores the implementation of Ghana’s local language in education policy; how it has been received and practiced in public basic schools, and the major challenges and implications. Through the study, the author highlights critical issues within local education practices that suggest a mismatch between education language policy and classroom practice. It is suggested that one of the primary reasons for the poor performance in schools lies in the oral orientation to classroom practices at the foundation stage at the expense of literate ways of thinking and reasoning and that an emphasis on literacy in the mother tongue at the foundation stage may help to shift the focus on student academic development where it belongs.

Keywords: English Language, Implementation, Language policy, Literacy, Mother tongue

Vol 4, Issue 1, March 2016 ()

Keywords: Code-Mixing, Idioms, Literacy, Native Proverb, Rosmary Ede

A Socio-Stylistic Analysis of Niyi Osundare’s “Blues for the New Senate King” (Published)

Style is an important aspect of literary analysis of text. The manipulation of words by a writer creates a distinct style through which he/she reaches out to the audience. A literary stylistic analysis of Niyi Osundare’s “Blues for the New Senate King” is carried out in order to demonstrate to the readers that a poet can deploy language to achieve satirical effect. To achieve this, lexico-syntactic patterns, graphological devices, phonological and morphological choices of the poet are stylistically analysed, using the approach that describes style as the linguistic choice of a writer. The paper found out that each of the linguistic choices has identifiable function that is performed in the poem. It is concluded that these linguistic elements contribute meaningfully to the overall message of the poem which satirizes the ignominious manner in which the Nigerian Senate President assumed the leadership of the upper chamber of legislature in Nigeria for the 8th Assembly.

Keywords: Linguistic, Literacy, Nigeria, Niyi Osundare, Poet, Style

ORALITY, LITERACY AND PEDAGOGICAL IMPLICATIONS IN TRADITIONAL AFRICAN SOCIETIES: THE BAKOR EXPERIENCE IN CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA. (Published)

Knowledge acquisition, like all human interaction in the world depends on and is enhanced through verbal or written forms which, today, exist at parallels but are never dichotomous, yet oral cultures seem to be more pervasive than written cultures in many parts of the world. History and knowledge systems are located in memory, the personal lives, traditions and the mythical past of all communities in the world. Today, literature has commonly been associated with written forms yet most other cultures of the world, apart from western cultures, have produced a wide range of literary material all encoded in verbal or non-written genres. Oral discourses are, therefore, predominant in most indigenous communities all over the world and knowledge systems have as such been constructed and communicated through these oral discourses or verbal systems, with emphasis on graphic contextual performances. African verbal forms, perhaps, constitute the largest stock of literary material performed, sung or spoken in numerous social or ritualistic contexts. These enhance encoding of new meaning and knowledge through the transmission of ideas and in most contexts, oral or verbal communication surpasses all other forms of communication. Despite this importance of orality, the supposed supremacy of a scientific consciousness which is enhanced by writing has become coterminous with the relegation of verbal performances leading to the failure to understand the nature and function of oral literature and its pedagogical content amongst oral cultures. Literacy is consequently emphasized over orality and contextuality. Recent developments in the academia, however, have tended to emphasize the supremacy of orality as a preferred mode of socialization and pedagogical functions. Anthropologists, literary critics, folklorists, creative writers and even psychologists all attest to the dynamism of oral literature in the production and transmission of knowledge systems not only in Africa but generally in pre-literate societies all over the world. This paper, therefore, examines the extent to which Oral literature can serve as a base for the development of a pedagogical model for instruction of our younger generations in African knowledge systems using the Bakor experience as an example.

Keywords: Cultural context and Identity, Knowledge systems, Literacy, Orality, Pedagogy, Performance context, Traditional African Society