Tag Archives: Individualized Instructional Method and Students’ Achievement

Effects of Individualized Instructional Method on Secondary School Students’ Achievement in Social Studies (Published)

The study investigated effects of individualized instructional method on secondary school students’ achievement in Social Studies. Two research questions and null hypotheses. The design of the study was quasi-experimental research design and the area of the study was Onueke education zone of Ebonyi State. The population of the study comprised two thousand seven hundred and ninety-three (2,793) junior secondary school two (JSS II) students drawn from public secondary schools in Onueke education zone of Ebonyi State. The instrument used for data collection was Social Studies Achievement Test (SOSAT), data were analyzed using mean and standard deviation for all research questions, and analysis of co-variance (ANCOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. The findings of the study revealed that the mean achievement scores of secondary school students taught Social Studies using individualized instructional method was higher than the mean achievement scores of those taught Social Studies using conventional methods, female secondary school students taught Social Studies using individualized instructional method obtained higher mean scores than male students taught Social studies using conventional method. The findings of the study also revealed that there were significant effects of individualized instructional method on mean achievement of students in Social Studies in urban and rural secondary schools in Onueke education zone. Based on these findings, the researcher recommended that Social studies teachers should re-assess their classroom instructional practice because there is a need for them to shift from instructional practice, which makes learners passive listeners to the practice that engages learners actively in the instructional processes.

Keywords: Individualized Instructional Method and Students’ Achievement, Social Studies