Tag Archives: Hull

Dietary Fibres Composition Analysis of Carob Seed Tegument as Locust Bean Gum Contaminants’ (Published)

The proximate composition and the fibres content of the carob seed tegument were analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of carob seed hull fragments (as contaminants) on locust bean gum (a galactomannan usually used as food additive) composition.The separation of the seed components by boiling water pre-treatment furnished ~30% of brown coat. The seed coat fibres analysis by enzymatic-gravimetric method with phosphate buffer showed that carob husk contain ~75% IDF (insoluble dietary fiber) and ~15% SDF (soluble dietary fiber). In addition, the NDF (neutral-detergent fibre) composition, determined by non-enzymatic-gravimetric method with detergent solution, revealed the presence of ~20% of insoluble hemicelluloses, ~33% of cellulose and ~9% of lignin fractions. These results suggest that this product may be regarded as a potential fibre source for Locust bean gum flour enrichment, and suitable for use as food ingredient.

Keywords: ., Carob seed Tegument, Ceratonia siliqua L., Dietary fibre, Hull, Locust Bean Gum, husk

Dietary Fibres Composition Analysis of Carob Seed Tegument as Locust Bean Gum Contaminants’ (Published)

The proximate composition and the fibres content of the carob seed tegument were analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of carob seed hull fragments (as contaminants) on locust bean gum (a galactomannan usually used as food additive) composition. The separation of the seed components by boiling water pre-treatment furnished ~30% of brown coat. The seed coat fibres analysis by enzymatic-gravimetric method with phosphate buffer showed that carob husk contain ~75% IDF (insoluble dietary fiber) and ~15% SDF (soluble dietary fiber). In addition, the NDF (neutral-detergent fibre) composition, determined by non-enzymatic-gravimetric method with detergent solution, revealed the presence of ~20% of insoluble hemicelluloses, ~33% of cellulose and ~9% of lignin fractions. These results suggest that this product may be regarded as a potential fibre source for Locust bean gum flour enrichment, and suitable for use as food ingredient

Keywords: ., Carob seed Tegument, Ceratonia siliqua L., Dietary fibre, Hull, Locust Bean Gum, husk

The Water Balance of the Sand Clay Areas, Holderness Plain, Kingston upon Hull, England (Published)

Direct confirmation of the external sources was sought, and an indirect attempt to quantify it was made, via the water balance calculations analyses and discussion. Water balance components were calculated for the two sub-catchments at Great Hatfield and South Field as well as for the entire Catchwater Drain catchment. These water balance analyses showed that the predominant low flow contributions to total stream flow during dry weather periods, came from the sandy deposits in the Great Hatfield area, and that these contributions were able to sustain stream flow during dry weather periods, especially in July, August and September. However, the observed low flow contributions greatly exceeded the water balance estimates of low flow over the two dry periods of 1987 and 1988. Also, the observed runoff at the outlet of the Catchwater Drain catchment in dry periods, which analyses of channel flow conditions and measurements of discharge showed came from the sandy areas at Great Hatfield, was much higher than the runoff estimated from the water balance for all the sandy areas combined. In this way both the existence and the scale of the external source of low flow from the sandy areas were confirmed. Furthermore, it seemed reasonable to infer, from the water balance analyses, that the external source occurred at some depth below the Catchwater drain catchment and was probably the underlying Chalk aquifer.

Keywords: England, Holderness Plain, Hull, Kingston, Sand Clay, Water Balance