Tag Archives: Growth Rate

Econometrics analysis of the Relationship between Climate Change and Economic Growth in Selected West African Countries (Published)

Linkages between Climate Change, Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction have become increasingly most popular in local and international communities. This is due to the fact that we are currently facing pressing issues about climate change and poverty reduction effects in our planet. In this paper an empirical testing of the effects of Climate Change, Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction was carried out. Four equation models were developed to test the relationship amongst them. Panel estimation of 13 West African countries with similar climate, economic growth and poverty status from 1969 to 2016 were selected from World Development Indicator (WDI). Panel estimation methods of fixed effect, random effect, and panel unit root test-fisher type with trend and constant were applied.  From the results, shows that economic growth has a negative and highly significant effect on the growth rate of poverty in the selected West African countries. The growth rate of economics on the growth rate of food security is slightly significant. Using growth rate of economics as dependent variable, the result shows that growth rate of poverty is highly significant. The population living in rural areas is significant with growth of poverty and highly significant with growth rate of food security in West African countries under study. The results reveal that growth rate of economics is significant and positive coefficient on the growth rate of climate change. Growth rate of food security on the growth rate of climate change statistically significant and associated with negative sign.

Keywords: Food Security, Growth Rate, Hausman test, Poverty Reduction, panel estimation

Testing the Environmental Kuznet curve in selected West African countries: Empirical Evidence Estimation (Published)

Environmental economics studied has become increasingly most popular in local and international communities. This is due to the fact that we are currently facing pressing issues about climate change effects in our planet. In this paper we empirical testing the environmental kuznet curve hypothesis by analysis the relationship between environmental quality (Proxy carbon (VI) oxide (CO2) emission per capita) and per capita income. The panel estimation such as fixed effect and random effect were applied. From the results, the fixed effect model for CO2 revealed that population density, per capita income, per capita income squared, trade openness, exchange rate(real effective exchange rate proxy), and agriculture were statistically significant. The negative coefficient indicated in the following variables-agriculture, exchange rate, and trade openness. Any percentage increases in those variables, reduces the Environmental quality (proxy CO2) in selected West African countries. The results further indicated that trade openness lead to an increases in environmental pollution by improving key economic activities such as mining, which may reduce CO2 per capita emission in the selected West Africa countries.  For the population density has positive and significant effects on environmental quality and has the a-priori expectation in our model.

Keywords: CO2 Emission, Growth Rate, Per Capita Income, environmental quality, panel estimation

Sorghum Productivity Trends and Growth Rate for Lesotho (Published)

Aims of paper were: to compare area planted and harvested sorghum; determine production trend over the time-period of 53 years; estimate productivity trend and growth rate; and compare National Cereals supply–demand balance. Time series data collected from FAOSTAT and Bureau of Statistics spanning 1960 to 2013 were subjected to GENSTAT for statistical analysis. Results showed persistent decline in area planted and harvested. Area under sorghum cultivation, production and yield fluctuated erratically throughout study period. Production decreased from 84 000 tonnes in 1975 to 22 000 tonnes in 2010, with only 18% of the period recording yield above 1 tonne ha-1. Increase production area did not always translate into higher yield. Despite low yield, sorghum utilization was 16 000 tonnes compared to 11 000 tonnes produced, thus necessitating an import of 5 000 tonnes, thus there was higher sorghum self-sufficiency level. Promotion of sorghum production and its use should be revisited to address food security and export value.

Keywords: Growth Rate, Lesotho, Sorghum, Trend Analysis