Tag Archives: Error Analysis

A Longitudinal Analysis Study of Writing Errors Made by EFL Students at Al-Quds Open University (QOU) the Case of Language Use Course (Published)

Errors are considered by many educators to be an integral part of the teaching – learning process. The writing errors of English -major students, in particular, are considered to be significant and beneficial since they can be used to identify the pedagogical problems that might be the reasons of these errors, to predict some possible difficulties in student’s writing especially when they need to sit for exams in the literary courses and most importantly to prepare effective teaching materials and activities that take into account students’ needs and problems. This study, therefore, aimed to analyze a corpus of English texts written by students of a course entitled Language Use at Al-Quds Open University in Nablus in three years (2103 -2015). The objective of the study was to identify the possible types of errors, their frequency and possible causes so as to come up with some recommendations and suggestions that can help both instructors and students at QOU to minimize the frequency of these errors and their negative in the future courses especially when sitting for written exams and submitting assignments and reports. To achieve these objectives, frequencies, percentages and means of errors were calculated and tabulated .Results revealed that the most frequent error type was spelling which scored 39.60 % while relativization scored the least frequent type of errors, about 2.179 %.

Keywords: EFL, Error Analysis, Language use, QOU

Language Transfer: The Case of Teleconferencing Teaching/Learning in English Language at the Ghana Technology University College (Published)

This research work seeks to assess how computing, through teleconferencing could be used to contribute to the effectiveness of language teaching/learning in Africa, in general, and in Ghanaian universities, in particular through socio-cognitive and communicative language teaching approaches, explorative and investigative research. The study addresses the impact of French language on teaching/learning of English via teleconferencing teaching and learning in English. Language transfer has always occurred face-to- face delivery of teaching and learning but this research seeks to emphasise the results of learners’ performance through technology in didactics known as teleconferencing teaching and learning with the particular emphasis on errors committed. The study applies cognitive and socio-cognitive approaches to teaching/learning of languages via teleconferencing as well as using contrastive analysis to analyse common errors Francophone learners commit in English language (L3). It was discovered that the errors committed were due to language incompetence or perception blind spot or due to their background as francophone learners who have English language as L3, as well as overgeneralisation and wrong application of English structures.  The paper stresses that language transfer or negative transfer either face-to-face teaching/learning or teleconferencing is concomitant of human existence, particularly in language teaching and learning.

Keywords: Cognitive approach, Communicative Approach, Error Analysis, Language transfer, Socio-cognitive Approaches, Technology in Didactics, Teleconferencing teaching/learning

Lessons In Lexical Error Analysis. Revisiting Hemchua And Schmitt (2006); An Analysis Of The Lexical Errors In The Compositions Of Greek Learners (Published)

This paper replicates Hemchua and Schmitt’s (2006) study into types and frequency of lexical errors in Thai university students’ compositions. To investigate the usability, reliability and validity of their framework, 20 Greek learners’ compositions were analysed, following the original methodology. Results concerning the number, distribution and frequency of lexical errors were remarkably similar; approximately one third of all errors were formal, two thirds were semantic and less than 13% were attributable to transfer. Four of the five most common sub-categories of error in the replication were also found in the most common five sub-categories in the original study, suggesting that the framework, when applied to a different context and nationality, produces similar results and may reveal common problems between different English learners with different first languages. Difficulties in error identification and categorisation are discussed in detail, and suggestions for development of an improved framework for analysing lexical error are made.

Keywords: Error Analysis, Formal Errors, Lexical Error Analysis, Marking Written compositions, Semantic Errors, Transfer Errors

Analyzing Indonesian-English Abstracts Translation in view of Translation Errors by Google Translate (Published)

This study seeks to investigate the frequency of errors in the translation of abstracts produced by Google Translate with reference to Keshavarzʼs (1999) model of error analysis. This research will be of great benefit to undergraduate students to use these findings as a guideline in writing a thesis abstract. Five types of error classification is used as the parameters, namely lexicosemantic error, tense error, preposition error, word order error, distribution and use of verb group error, and active and passive voice error. The data were obtained from several faculties at the Methodist University of Indonesia, Medan. A total of ten abstracts of undergraduate students’ paper from various faculties were randomly selected. The data are then compared on each sentence segment and any words or phrases found to have errors are analyzed. The study revealed that 21 frequencies in terms of lexicosemantic errors, 9 frequencies in terms of tense errors, 13 frequencies in terms of preposition error, 27 frequencies in terms of word order error, 15 frequencies in terms of distribution and use of verb group errors, 8 frequencies in terms of active and passive voice errors.

Keywords: Abstract Translation, Error Analysis, Machine Translation, Translation Errors

Sudanese EFL Learners’ Sources of Errors in the Production of Articles (Published)

The purpose of this study is to detect to what extent Sudanese EFL learners commit errors attributable to the differences between their L1 and L2. Furthermore discovering the types of errors in use of articles (omission of articles, redundant, or wrong use of articles) is among the objectives of the study. In the direction of checking the status of various categories of errors of articles made by Sudanese EFL learners as a result of the transitional limitations between Arabic and English, an error analysis was performed. Therefore, the researcher developed a writing task in order to find out the inter-lingual article errors committed by the participants as a result of transfer between L1 and L2. A total number of 25 male students studying English at the tertiary level took part in the study and carried out the writing task. The analysis of the results indicated significant differences between different types of errors made by the participants. Sudanese EFL learners had the most problems in terms of the errors related to the redundant use of articles. They were at the second position in the errors of wrong use of articles and finally they had the less frequent errors with respect to the omission of articles in L2 while writing into English.

Keywords: EFL, Error, Error Analysis, Inter-language, Intra-Lingual Error, Mother tongue, Sources Of Errors, Written Production, target language

An Error Analysis of a Nigerian Postgraduate Student in a United Kingdom University (Published)

This study presents an error analysis on an adult Nigerian postgraduate student in the United Kingdom. The results reveal that there are a lot of errors which associated with both Interlingua and intralingua. His second language development moves at lower rate. However, in some instances he has been using appropriate aspects of target language; that at certain points he realises inappropriate use of target language and makes self-correction. In terms of teaching implication, some errors can be corrected immediately while others can be delayed because too much negative feedback may hinder the progress of the learner. For example, the omission of /s/ sound can be ignored for immediate correction because it is often unnoticed, whereas errors associated with unmarked verb form can be corrected immediately.

Keywords: Error Analysis, Inter-language, Interlingua, Intralingua, Nigeria, Postgraduate Students, Second Language Acquisition

THE COMPREHENSION AND PRODUCTION OF ENGLISH GRAMMATICAL COLLOCATIONS BY KUWAITI EFL LEARNERS (Published)

This study aims to investigate Kuwaiti EFL learners’ ability to comprehend and produce grammatical collocations in English. It also examines whether their English proficiency level and the type of grammatical collocation influence their comprehension and production of such collocations. The results show that the difference in performance between the advanced learners and intermediate learners was enough to differ statistically on both comprehension and production tests. Furthermore, the most frequent types of errors that may occur as well as some possible reasons for their occurrence have been identified. Noun + preposition and adjective + preposition were the most problematic types in comparison with other types in both groups. It has been suggested that L1 interference plays a central role in the comprehension and production of grammatical collocations by Kuwaiti EFL learners. Particularly, literal translation from Arabic has been found to be the main reason for grammatical collocation errors. The prepositions in Arabic do not usually correspond to their English counterparts e.g., at in angry at, which is literally translated to *angry from in Arabic. Finally, lack of knowledge of grammatical collocations is also an important reason behind such errors. It might be suggested that English language curricula taught in Kuwait do not pay enough attention to grammatical collocations. The study concludes with some pedagogical implications that may help teachers of English as a second/foreign language increase the awareness of grammatical collocations.

Keywords: Collocations, Error Analysis, Kuwaiti EFL learners, Kuwaiti Spoken Arabic, L1 interference, SLA, grammatical collocations

THE COMPREHENSION OF ENGLISH LEXICAL COLLOCATIONS BY KUWAITI EFL LEARNERS (Published)

This study aims to contribute to an understanding of the comprehension of lexical collocations by Kuwaiti EFL learners. Particularly, it attempts to investigate whether the participants’ English proficiency level affects their comprehension of lexical collocations. The results showed that Kuwaiti EFL learners have little awareness of lexical collocations in English. Also, it showed that there were differences between the advanced and intermediate Kuwaiti EFL learners in terms of their comprehension of lexical collocations. However, these differences were not enough to be statistically significant. Furthermore, the most frequent types of errors and the possible reasons for their occurrence were identified. The types Adjective + noun and Verb (action) + noun /pronoun/ prepositional phrase were the most problematic in comparison with other types in both groups. On the other hand, Quantifier + noun was the least problematic type. It has been suggested that L1 interference plays a central role in the acquisition of lexical collocations by Kuwaiti EFL learners. Additionally, lack of knowledge of lexical collocations may also be a main reason behind such errors. The study recommended that English language teachers need to pay more attention to lexical collocations due to their crucial importance in second language acquisition.

Keywords: Collocations, Error Analysis, Kuwaiti EFL learners, Kuwaiti Spoken Arabic, Lexical collocations, SLA

AN ERROR ANALYSIS OF THE USE OF ENGLISH MODIFIERS AMONG YORUBA BILINGUALS (Published)

In a fairly obvious sense, any native speaker of a language can be said to know the grammar of his or her native language. After all, native speakers clearly know how to form and interpret words, phrases and sentences in their native language, Radford (1997). But this, clearly, is not the case with L2 learners. In today’s world, bilingualism has become an entrenched part of societal values. The pre-eminent position of the English language in global affairs has made its use widespread in international trade, international scholarship and scientific research. It is used as a second tongue to millions of users of other languages, Nigeria inclusive. However the study of psychological correlates of language has revealed that a bilingual speaker is (probably) never equally competent in both languages, Lado (1957). Therefore, this paper aims at discovering and describing the problems that the L2 learner of English will have. The theoretical frameworks adopted for the study involves a synthesis of inter language theory model and Quirk and Greenbaum’s Performance and Judgment test. The study recommends that teachers and curriculum planners should employ both diagnostic and prognostic methods in addressing problems encountered by the L2 learners of English and that language learning tasks should be made to accommodate a variety of language activities since languages, generally, are ever dynamic.

Keywords: English Modifiers, Error Analysis, Yoruba Bilinguals

A LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF ERRORS IN LEARNERS’ COMPOSITIONS: THE CASE OF ARBA MINCH UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (Published)

This study reports the dominant linguistic errors that occur in the written productions of Arba Minch University (hereafter AMU) students. It examines the nature of the errors that AMU students commit in expressing their ideas in writing. A sample of paragraphs was collected for two years from students ranging from freshmen to graduating level. The sampled compositions were then coded, described, and explained using error analysis method. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses showed that almost all components of the English language (such as orthography, morphology, syntax, mechanics, and semantics) in learners’ compositions have been affected by the errors. On the basis of surface structures affected by the errors, the following kinds of errors have been identified: addition of an auxiliary (*I was read by gass light), omission of a verb (Sex before marriage ^ many disadvantages), misformation in word class (riskable for risky) and misordering of major constituents in utterances (*I joined in 2003 Arba minch university). The study identified two causes which triggered learners’ errors: intralingual and interlingual. However, the majority of the errors attributed to intralingual causes which mainly resulted from the lack of full mastery on the basics of the English language

Keywords: Error, Error Analysis, Error Taxonomy, Interlingual, Intralingual, Linguistic Component

A Linguistic Analysis of Errors in Learners’ Compositions: The Case of Arba Minch University Students (Review Completed - Accepted)

This study reports the dominant linguistic errors that occur in the written productions of Arba Minch University (hereafter AMU) students. It examines the nature of the errors that AMU students commit in expressing their ideas in writing. A sample of paragraphs was collected for two years from students ranging from freshmen to graduating level. The sampled compositions were thencoded, described, and explained using error analysis method. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses showed that almost all components of the English language (such as orthography, morphology, syntax, mechanics, and semantics) in learners’ compositions have been affected by the errors. On the basis of surface structures affected by the errors, the following kinds of errors have been identified: addition of an auxiliary (*I was read by gass light), omission of a verb (Sex before marriage ^ many disadvantages), misformation in word class (riskable for risky) and misordering of major constituents in utterances (*I joined in 2003 Arba minch university). The study identified two causes which triggered learners’ errors: intralingual and interlingual. However, the majority of the errors attributed to intralingual causes which mainly resulted from the lack of full mastery on the basics of the English language

Keywords: Error, Error Analysis, Error Taxonomy, Interlingual, Intralingual, Linguistic Component