Tag Archives: Divergence

Triangulation in a Quasi-Experimental Mixed Methods Study: Convergence, Divergence, and Complementarity of Results (Published)

Mixed methods research is empirically known to bring about converging, diverging, and/or complementary results and this remains a methodological illumination to embrace and a challenge to overcome. The existing literature deals with the review of relevant research results in mixed methods studies with limited testing whether and how results, different or similar, originate from the integrated data analysis and how additional non-quantitized or non-qualitized data are used. After matching phase-one with phase-two respondents, we merged quantitized essay and interview data (qualitative methods strand) with survey questionnaire data (quantitative methods strand), performed mixed and non-mixed data analyses to statistically compare and enrich results from both methods strands. The aim of this article is to move beyond the mixing of methods and data and triangulate results. We statistically test, empirically analyse, and offer guidance on the practical dimensions to consider while mixing qualitative and quantitative methods.

Keywords: Convergence, Divergence, Mixed Methods Research, Triangulation, complementarity, data integration

PRICE TRANSMISSION ANALYSIS ALONG THE FOOD CHAIN (Published)

Vertical price transmission between wheat and flour markets in Kazakhstan has been analyzed using monthly data during the period 2000-2010. Officials applied a wide variety of policies in response to global wheat price increases, often causing adverse and unintended effects on regional domestic wheat and flour prices. Overall, short-run policies aimed especially at mitigating wheat and flour prices were unsuccessful, causing greater instability and uncertainty in domestic market. The results confirm that price transmission between wheat and flour switched over the period. The PMG model was performed separately with the two regimes, and indicated that price transmission significantly altered under regime changes. Although overall coefficient differences in the two regimes are modest, the results across regions have different patterns in depicting huge differences in coefficients and magnitude. Moreover, The Granger causality test implies that the global wheat price is a good determinant of price differences across oblasts (regions)

Keywords: Divergence, Export, Kazakhstan, Price Transmission, Wheat Production