Tag Archives: deconstruction

Exploring the Constructs of Derrida’s Religiosity in the Teachings of the Gita: A Comparative Study (Published)

The questions on religion and God have always been perplexing and they have remained as issues in academia. This has become more burning issue since Derrida’s introduction of deconstruction to academia in 1960s as both Derrida’s personality and deconstruction remained controversial regarding these issues. So in this paper I have reviewed the studies on Derrida and deconstruction in relation to religion and God with the purpose to find out the constructs to identify Derrida’s religiosity and its similarities with the teachings of the Gita. Then I have employed these constructs to explore the teachings of the Gita as a comparative study and identified that the constructs of Derrida’s religiosity go in the line with the teachings of the Gita. Thus both of them suggest the deconstructive understanding of religion and God; they identify religion as the pursuit of the truth and justice and God as the undeconstructible, a sacred reality; they are comprehensive and inclusive of all as they are guided by a quasi-transcendental logic and deconstructive belief. Thus, this study has made a significant foundation for the study of postmodern spirituality and its enhancement for promoting interspirituality and sustainable peace in the world.

Keywords: Derrida, Derrida's Religiosity, God, Postmodern Spirituality, Religion., Teachings of the Gita, deconstruction, interspirituality

Language in the Portrayal of the Protagonists of Achebe’s Novels (Published)

This paper analyses the language used in the portrayal of the characters of Chinua Achebe’s novels. This is the language used by the characters in discourse, and the narrators in the novels. The study reveals that the protagonists start off as heroes and eventually end up as antiheroes on account of high-handedness, dishonesty, corruption, violence, sexual promiscuity, ill temperament, vindictiveness, and murder. The study applies the theory of deconstruction in the assessment of the characters and reveals that the protagonists are antiheroes rather than heroes: Okonkwo in Things Fall Apart (1958), Obi Okonkwo in No Longer at Ease (1960), Ezeulu in Arrow of God (1964), Odili Samalu in A Man of the People (1966), and Sam in Anthills of the Savannah (1988). In deconstructing the protagonists, the five primary texts are read the first time and they reveal the protagonists as heroes. This first reading forms the basis for the second deconstructive “critical reading” which unveils the heroes as antiheroes.  The publications and the themes of the novels of Achebe span over pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial Nigeria. Subsequently, the paper concludes that as antiheroes, the protagonists are barbaric and are not good exemplary African leaders. The characters therefore present the novels they appear in as colonialist, rather than anti-colonialist literature. This paper therefore recommends that Achebe’s novels should be seen as colonialist literature.

Keywords: Language, Protagonists, antihero, deconstruction, hero