Tag Archives: Cultural Beliefs

Socio-Economic Factors Influencing in-Patient Satisfaction With Health Care at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria. (Published)

Previous studies have focused largely on waiting time, cost of treatment and not much has been documented on in-patient outcome of  health care seeking in a tertiary institutions from the point of view of the patient themselves. This study, investigates the socio-economic factors that determine in-patient satisfaction with care at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria. The Sick Role Model, and Social Action theories guided the study and the research design was cross-sectional survey. A Multistage sampling technique was used to select 420 respondents from the five units of the hospital. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain relevant information from the respondents. Fifteen In-depth interviews (IDIs) were also conducted. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square while the qualitative data were content analysed. Findings show that, 61.4% were female, 70.0% were married, 42.0% had secondary school education, and 90% were Christians. Ninety-five percent indicated moderate level of satisfaction from the use of health care. Forty-seven percent indicated that economic constraint has influence on their use and satisfaction with the health care provided. Also, cultural beliefs, recipients’ age, spousal roles, access to multiple doctors, and staff-patient relationship, health education, income and occupation influenced their satisfaction. It is  recommended that socio-economic factors as they affect outcome of in-patients’ and  utilization of the available health care services be integrated into their medical services in the hospital organization providing health care services especially in teaching hospital. It is important for health care professionals to give consideration to cultural beliefs and economic issues of recipients who are seeking health care in the teaching hospital.      

Keywords: Cultural Beliefs, Health Care, In-Patient Satisfaction, Income

A Socio-Cultural Enquiry into Chuchuru: the ‘Spirit Child’ Phenomenon among Kasena-Nankana People in the Upper East Region of Ghana (Published)

The Chuchuru (spirit child) is a socio-cultural practice among the Kasena-Nankana people in the Upper East Region of Ghana. The practice is based on the belief that bush spirits take over unborn children whose mothers breach particular taboos during their conception. They are believed to deliberately inflict disabilities on the born child who is given a duty to punish the mother. Such children are forcefully killed to prevent them from bringing untold calamity on their parents and the entire community. A qualitative study with descriptive research method was carried out to investigate into the socio-cultural practice to enlighten the general public on it. The data for the study were collected from a 100 purposively sampled respondents via personal and focus group discussions as well as direct observations. The qualitative data analysis method was used for analyzing the solicited data. The study revealed that the Chuchuru socio-cultural practice is believed to be used by the people in preventing and appeasing the anger of their deities and ancestors. This negative socio-cultural practice results in the high toll of deaths of innocent children with physical abnormalities who could have been saved medically. The study recommends that there should be stringent measures put in place by the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs, the Ministry of Health as well as the National Commission on Civic Education to educate the people on the need to shun this inhumane socio-cultural practice while prosecuting culprits of the Chuchuru socio-cultural practice.

Keywords: Child Disability, Chuchuru, Cultural Beliefs, Socio-Cultural Practices, Spirit Child

Socio-Economic Factors Influencing In-Patient Satisfaction With Health Care At The University Of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria (Published)

Previous studies have focused largely on waiting time, cost of treatment and not much has been documented on in-patient outcome of health care seeking in a tertiary institutions from the point of view of the patient themselves. This study, investigates the socio-economic factors that determine in-patient satisfaction with care at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria. The Sick Role Model, and Social Action theories guided the study and the research design was cross-sectional survey. A Multistage sampling technique was used to select 420 respondents from the five units of the hospital. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain relevant information from the respondents. Fifteen In-depth interviews (IDIs) were also conducted. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square while the qualitative data were content analysed. Findings show that, 61.4% were female, 70.0% were married, 42.0% had secondary school education, and 90% were Christians. Ninety-five percent indicated moderate level of satisfaction from the use of health care. Forty-seven percent indicated that economic constraint has influence on their use and satisfaction with the health care provided. Also, cultural beliefs, recipients’ age, spousal roles, access to multiple doctors, and staff-patient relationship, health education, income and occupation influenced their satisfaction.  It is  recommended that socio-economic factors as they affect outcome of in-patients’ and  utilization of the available health care services be integrated into their medical services in the hospital organization providing health care services especially in teaching hospital. It is important for health care professionals to give consideration to cultural beliefs and economic issues of recipients who are seeking health care in the teaching hospital.

Keywords: Cultural Beliefs, Health Care, In-Patient Satisfaction, Income