Tag Archives: Cross River

Mathematics Teachers’ Leadership Styles and Learning Motivation among Secondary School Students in Cross River State, Nigeria (Published)

The study investigated Mathematics teachers’ leadership styles and learning motivation as perceived by secondary school students in Calabar Education Zone of Cross River State. The study utilized descriptive research design. Three research questions were asked to guide the study. Sample size was five hundred and ninety nine (599) SSII students randomly selected  from 49 public secondary schools through stratified random sampling technique. Mathematics Teachers’ Leadership Styles and Learning Motivation Questionnaires (MTLSMQ) with reliability coefficient of 0.74 were used to gather data for the study. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression statistical technique. Result showed that there is significant positive relationship between teachers’ leadership styles and students learning motivation. Based on the findings, ,it was recommended among others that training programme on leadership and general attitude to work should be organized for mathematics teachers in particular and teachers in general. This will help them to realize that they are leaders in the classroom.

Keywords: Cross River, Leadership Style, Learning, Motivation, Students, Teacher

The System of Slavery in Bakor, South-Eastern Nigeria 1850-1960 (Published)

The subject of slavery, especially the status of slaves in African societies, has understandably attracted scholarly attention. Using Bakor society in south-eastern Nigeria as a case study, this paper seeks to contribute to existing knowledge about slave systems in Nigeria. On the basis of fieldwork carried out in Mfom, an Ekajuk community in Bakor area, in conjunction with relevant written sources, it has been established that a sizable percentage of Bakor population is of slave origin. These slaves were originally recruited from outside Bakorland and the primary reason for the purchase of slaves was to augment the population of matrilineages which appeared to be declining during the period covered by this study. It was for this reason that female slaves were preferred. The study also shows that there existed an efficient traditional method of intergrating slaves into the society. This, in addition to the fact that slaves never suffered any form of discrimination made it difficult to distinguish between slave and free born.

Keywords: Bansara, Cross River, Mfom, Nigeria, Slavery

Cross River Tourism, History and Environment: A Marriage Contracted In the Womb of Time (Published)

Today, it can be safely argued that Cross River State is noted more for its tourism enterprise than for anything else. Since 1999 to date, there have been sustained efforts by successive administrations to re-engineer and rebrand the State as a tourism spectacle and hub not just in the Cross River Region but in Nigeria and indeed, the West Africa Sub-region at large. This paper seeks to show that there is an organic and inescapable relationship between Cross River’s current tourism efforts and its history and environment. Put differently, we would attempt to demonstrate that the foundation of Cross River tourism is embedded in its history and environment and it is from these pristine bowels that the current initiatives can truly find rhythm, momentum and relevance.

Keywords: Cross River, Environment, Nigeria, Tourism, history

The System of Slavery in Bakor, South-Eastern Nigeria, 1850-1960 (Published)

The subject of slavery, especially the status of slaves in African societies, has understandably attracted scholarly attention. Using Bakor society in south-eastern Nigeria as a case study, this paper seeks to contribute to existing knowledge about slave systems in Nigeria. On the basis of fieldwork carried out in Mfom, an Ekajuk community in Bakor area, in conjunction with relevant written sources, it has been established that a sizable percentage of Bakor population is of slave origin. These slaves were originally recruited from outside Bakorland and the primary reason for the purchase of slaves was to augment the population of matrilineages which appeared to be declining during the period covered by this study. It was for this reason that female slaves were preferred. The study also shows that there existed an efficient traditional method of intergrating slaves into the society. This, in addition to the fact that slaves never suffered any form of discrimination made it difficult to distinguish between slave and free born.

Keywords: Bansara, Cross River, Mfom, Nigeria, Slavery

EFFECT OF NATIONAL SPECIAL PROGRAMME FOR FOOD SECURITY ON CASSAVA OUTPUT AMONG RURAL FARMERS IN CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA (Published)

This study was carried out to analyse the effect of National Special Programme for Food Security (NSPFS) on cassava output in among rural farmers in Cross River State, Nigeria. The specific objectives were to ascertain the socioeconomic characteristics of the respondents determine the effect of the programme on cassava output and identify the problems encountered by the beneficiaries. Data for the study were collected through structured questionnaire from the three agricultural zones in the state using multi-stage random sampling technique for the selection of beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries. A total of 203 respondents were used for the study. The tools used for data analyses included frequencies, percentages, means and paired t-test. The result indicated that most of the respondents were females and married. Most of them were between the ages of 31-40 years and had household size of 6-10 persons. Majority had secondary education and had annual income of less than N100, 000(one hundred thousand) naira. The paired t-test result indicated that the mean annual output of beneficiaries was higher and significantly different from that of the non-beneficiaries at 95% confidence level and late release of loan and inputs was rank first among other problems encountered by the beneficiaries. The study therefore recommended that NSPFS project site should be expanded to other communities across the state. Loan and other inputs from the NSPFS should be released early enough to the beneficiaries to effectively improve their productivity and enhance food security in the State.

Keywords: Cross River, NSPFS, Output, cassava, rural farmers