Tag Archives: Common Good

Elements of Economic Management in Jesus’ Instruction: “Gather up the Leftover Fragments that Nothing may be Lost” (John 6:12). (Published)

John 6:1-15 reveals certain dispositions that characterize the success of Jesus’ earthly ministry. These include: his sensitivity to the needs of his people, dialogue and collaboration, charity, prayerful dependence on the Father, and prudent management of resources and the avoidance of wastage. These are equally and essentially Jesus’ teaching to all his followers. The avoidance of wastage and the prudent management of resources are underscored in Jesus’ insistence on preserving the fragments of the multiplied fish and loaves in John 6:12. An effective management of a nation’s resources requires among others, these two dispositions. In some nations of the world, and especially in the African continent, these virtues are sometimes taken for granted. The consequences often contribute to underdevelopment. Using the qualitative method of research this work undertakes a narrative exegesis of John 6:12. It uses, consequently, the instruction of Jesus therein as a model to suggest that accountability and frugality are indispensable instruments for any purposeful economic management strategy that is aimed at achieving development. It recommends accountability and the avoidance of waste at both individual and corporate levels

Keywords: Accountability, Common Good, Economic Management, Faith, John 6

Interrogating an Imposed Constitutionalism in Contemporary African Countries (Published)

The work interrogates an imposed constitutionalism in contemporary African societies. We traced the development of imposed constitutionalism to 1945 when Japan was defeated and American drafted a constitution for Japanese which were described as old fashion and the present imposed constitutionalism been drafted and adopted under the shadow of gun; it happened in Yugoslavia, East Timor, Afghanistan and Iraq. Since majority of African states constitution are imposed, the work set out to examine the impact of imposed constitutionalism on contemporary African states. We discovered that the attempt by one country to impose a constitution on another country is bound to be a difficult task, more so when the reform is coming from outside. Because impose constitutionalism will bring with it a new culture, the cultural conditions that may not fixed in to the country concern. The work then suggests that the advanced countries should give the African opportunity to try their hand on their own constitution, the constitution that will fit in to the culture of the country concern. And the African on the other hand should endeavor to chose the best out of the crops of learned men endowed the continent to produce a constitution that will not only fit in to the culture but  that will take care of the common good of the citizen.

Keywords: African, Common Good, Constitution, Constitutionalism, Contemporary, Continent

Politicisation of the Counter-Insurgence Operations in Nigeria: Implication for the Political Economy (Published)

Political partisanship is a very intriguing game. However, the tendency among some megalomaniacs to politicise sensitive national issues has undermined Nigeria’s national interest as well as exacerbated its fragile security. Many political actors mainly from the two major political parties— PDP and APC— were more inclined to using incendiary utterances in order to score cheap political followership in the build up to the 2015 General Election. The study relied on documentary evidence through which data were generated for the validation of its hypothesis. It found that the inclination among these politicians and ethnic jingoists to politicise the counter-insurgence operations has not only sustained the insurgency but also undermined Nigeria’s political economy. Basically, it recommended the adoption of a non-partisan counter-insurgence approach as a remedy for Boko Haram insurgence.

Keywords: Boko Haram, Common Good, National Security, Political Economy, Politicisation