Tag Archives: Basic Education

Financing Basic Education in Nigeria: The Alternative Methods (Published)

The existing methods of funding public schools under the Universal Basic Education (UBE) programme is not adequate to meet the needs of the schools in Nigeria. This is causing a degradation in academic standards, facilities and equipment and poor outcomes among the learners.  Alternative sources of raising public funds to finance basic education have come into focus. Such attention has become important because basic education plays a very vital role in an educational system. These new strategies come as complements to the traditional modes through which schools can access needed fund, objectively to improve schools and achievements among learners.

Keywords: Basic Education, Financing, Nigeria, alternative methods, schools

Perception of Teachers in Regular Schools towards Inclusive Education in Tano South District, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana (Published)

This paper examines the extent of awareness of teachers on the concept of inclusive education, the perception teachers have on inclusive education and the perceived effects of inclusive education in the public basic schools towards the implementation    of inclusive education in the Tano South District in Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana.  Three research questions were formulated. Survey approach was adopted using questionnaire as the main data collection instrument. Forty (40) head teachers and one hundred and eighty five (185) teachers were selected from forty (40) basic schools for the study.  In all, a total of two hundred and twenty two (225) teachers and head teachers were randomly selected across the district and questionnaires administered to them. The questionnaires were semi-structured. Data was captured and analyzed.  The results presented in tables showed that most teachers and head teachers in Tano South District were aware of the concept of inclusive education but have no understanding on how the concept works. Teachers and head teachers alike disagreed inclusion of special needs children in regular classroom increase the child’s circle of friends, limit the child’s level of education or make a child well-adjusted socially among others. However, when the concept is implemented it would come with some benefits in the area of increase in the child’s circle of friends, limits the child’s level of education and also make a child well-adjusted socially. The study recommended that; teachers in regular basic schools in Tano South District be educated on the issues of the new policy of inclusive education concept. This, Ghana education service can achieve by organizing workshops at the district levels as well as regional levels for basic level teachers. Conscious effort should be made to make it visible and available to the schools in the district. Necessary equipment and instructional resources should be put in place for successful implementation of inclusive education

Keywords: Basic Education, Inclusive Education, Mainstream education, Perception, Regular Schools, Tano South District

The Impact of Ghana’s School Feeding Programme on Enrollment and Retention of Pupils in Talensi District in Upper East Region (Published)

This research work examined the impact of the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP) on enrolment and retention in basic schools in Talensi District of the Upper East Region of Ghana. The study examined the extent to which enrolment and retention can be influenced by the presence of School Feeding Programmes (SFPs).   It focused on finding out what motivates pupils to enroll in certain basic schools and the influence of GSFP on pupils learning.  The work was a survey of selected basic schools in the Talensi District which are enjoying the GSFP.  Two groups of population were used for this study; pupils and teachers. The population for pupils was 2,028 out of which forty (40) pupils were randomly selected as the sample size. On the other side, eight (8) teachers were purposively selected to form part of the sample size. Questionnaire was the main research tool used whilst interview was used to back up the main research instrument. The research found out that although basic school enrolment and retention were influenced by the presence of GSFP, the quality of teachers and good academic performance of schools were other factors influencing enrolment and retention in the schools under review. The study further found out that the presence of GSFP in basic schools had a positive effect on pupils’ academic performance. On the impact of the programme on basic school enrolment and retention, the conclusion drawn is that there is a direct and positive relationship between the presence of the GSFP in a school and the enrolment and retention of pupils in that school. Since the presence of the GSFP leads to increment in enrolment and retention, it will be prudent to replicate the programme in all public basic schools. This is particularly very important owing to the fact that this research has proven that the food pupils eat in schools contribute significantly to improvements in their learning. According to Del Rosso (1999) when children are fed in school, it is most likely to increase their attention, cognitive function and learning. Also, Lambers (2009) credited increased enrolment and retention of pupils to SFPs. The study concludes that the GSFP remains critical to the success of basic education and all efforts should be made to expand its structures and scope.

Keywords: Academic Improvement, Basic Education, Compulsory Universal Basic Education, Enrollment, Retention

Education Inequality with Emphasis on Schools Drop-Out among Girls in Basic Schools: A Case Study Of Tamale Metropolis In Northern Ghana (Published)

Over the years, Government of Ghana and Non-Governmental Organizations has implemented a number of policies and interventions aimed at achieving access and quality education which is gender inclusive in basic schools across the country. Some of these policies include School Feeding Programme, Capitation Grant, Free Exercise Books and recently the Free School Uniforms for pupils in Basic Schools among others. Despite these interventions, drop out from school especially among girls at the basic level it still a problem in Ghana. This paper specifically focused on school dropout among girls in basic schools in Ghana; A case study of Tamale Metropolis. The Metropolis was selected for the study because of the demographic characteristics that pose challenges to girls schooling and its accessibility with regards to location. Qualitative method was used to gain an insight into the perceptions and feelings of teachers, parents, out of school girls and girl learners on causes of dropouts among girls. The case study design was used because the researchers wanted to have a clear understanding of why and how girl child school dropout happens. The population of the study comprised of head teachers, teachers, parents, school girls and out of school girls. Purposive sampling was used to select 20 Primary Schools and 10 Junior High Schools from the district whose total enrolment of boys out number girls. Data was collected using interview as main instrument. The study also used secondary data from published dissertations, textbooks, journals and the internet. Several strategies were used to ensure data quality. The findings reveals that parental ignorance on value of girls education, poor parental care, teenage pregnancy, early marriage, poverty, child prostitution, migration of girls to major cities in the south to work as head potters and peer group influence are some of the major reasons why girls drop out of school in Tamale Metropolis. Based on the findings, it has been recommended that Government should roll out programmes to reduce poverty in the country. Scholarships and other incentives should be provided to needy but brilliant girls to enable them stay in school to learn for a brighter future. Sex education and career counselling should be given to girls to help reduce teenage pregnancies. Basic schools should also be encouraged to set up girls clubs to monitor and motivate girls to take their education seriously. Disable and girl friendly infrastructure should be provided in schools to make them safe for girls. Corporal punishment especially canning should be abolished entirely to make schools safer places for girls. Punitive actions should be given to those who marry school girls to serve as deterrent to others. Finally, parents within the metropolis should be sensitized on the value of girls education to enable them support their school girls to stay and learn in school for a brighter future.

Keywords: Basic Education, Dropout among girls, Poverty, Teenage Pregnancy and Girls Education.

Education Inequality with Emphasis on Schools Drop Out Among Girls in Basic Schools: A Case Study of Tamale Metropolis in Northern Ghana (Published)

Over the years, Government of Ghana and Non-Governmental Organizations have implemented a number of policies and interventions aimed at achieving access and quality education which is gender inclusive in basic schools across the country. Some of these policies from Government of Ghana include School Feeding Programme, Capitation Grant, Free Exercise Books and recently the Free School Uniforms for pupils in Basic Schools among others. Despite these interventions, drop out from school especially among girls at the basic level it still a problem in Ghana. This paper specifically focused on school dropout among girls in basic schools in Ghana; A case study of Tamale Metropolis. The Metropolis was selected for the study because of the demographic characteristics that pose challenges to girls schooling and its accessibility with regards to location. Qualitative method was used to gain an insight into the perceptions and feelings of teachers, parents, out of school girls and girl learners on causes of dropouts among girls. The case study design was used because the researchers wanted to have a clear understanding of why and how girl child school dropout happens. The population of the study comprised of head teachers, teachers, District Girls Education Officer, parents, school girls and out of school girls. Purposive sampling was used to select 20 Primary Schools and 10 Junior High Schools from the district whose total enrolment of boys out number girls. Data was collected using interview as main instrument. The study also used secondary data from published dissertations, textbooks, journals and the internet. Several strategies were used to ensure data quality. The findings reveals that parental ignorance on value of girls education, poor parental care, teenage pregnancy, early marriage, poverty, child prostitution, migration of girls to major cities in the south to work as head potters and peer group influence are some of the major reasons why girls drop out of school in Tamale Metropolis. Based on the findings, it has been recommended that Government should roll out programmes to reduce poverty in the country. Scholarships and other incentives should be provided to needy but brilliant girls to enable them stay in school to learn for a brighter future. Sex education and career counselling should be given to girls to help reduce teenage pregnancies. Basic schools should also be encouraged to set up girls clubs to monitor and motivate girls to take their education seriously. Disable and girl friendly infrastructure should be provided in schools to make them safe for girls. Corporal punishment especially canning should be abolished entirely to make schools safer places for girls. Punitive actions should be given to those who marry school girls to serve as deterrent to others. Finally, parents within the metropolis should be sensitized on the value of girls education to enable them support their school girls to stay and learn in school for a brighter future.

Keywords: Basic Education, Dropout among girls, Poverty, Teenage Pregnancy and Girls Education.