PERCEPTION OF THE DETERMINANTS OF MATERNAL MORTALITY IN CALABAR SOUTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA

Abstract

Objective: To identify perceived determinants of maternal mortality in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State. Study design: A cross-sectional study design was used to identify perceived determinants of maternal mortality in Calabar South Local Government Area of Cross River State. About 360 respondents were selected using multi-stage sampling technique and a structured questionnaire was used to generate data from the respondents. Data collected were analysed using SPSS version 16.0 and chi-square was used to test for association between variables at 0.01 level of significance. Results: The results showed that maternal death were known to occur at home (24.7%), health facilities (24.4%), Traditional Birth Attendant homes (12.5%), churches (0.3%) and 7.5% in prayer houses. About 45% of maternal deaths were believed to occur outside the health facilities. Bleeding (39.2%), prolonged obstructed labour (17.2%), eclampsia (4.2%), abortions (3.3%), infections (1.7%), anaemia (1.9%) and malaria (0.8%) were perceived causes of maternal deaths. Delays in taking actions when danger signs occurred (24.7%), delivery of high risks pregnant women outside the health facility (28.2%), non-utilisation of Antenatal services (19.7%) and non-chalant attitude of health workers towards pregnant women (19.6%) were reported to perpetuate maternal deaths. This study also showed that educational status (P<0.01), socio-economic status (P<0.01) of pregnant women and socio-cultural practices influence maternal outcomes. Conclusion: Improving obstetric services in health facilities would facilitate optimal use of ANC and delivery services among pregnant women.

Keywords: Calabar South LGA, Determinants, Pregnant Women, maternal deaths


Article Review Status: Published

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