Analysis of the Water Absorption Properties by using Polystyrene Sanded Concrete

Abstract

In this paper, an evaluation of the mechanical and hydrothermal characteristics of a polystyrene sanding lightweight concrete was studied. Mechanical properties are evaluated from a density point of view. Hydrothermal characteristics use water absorption as a measurement. In this study, 30% EPS was used to replace natural coarse aggregates and produce lightweight concrete. It is economical and practical and meets the criteria required for lightweight concrete. The bulk density of the concrete and oven dry density was obtained at 1789 KN / m 3 and 1674 kg / m 3, but the total water absorption and absorption of capillary water increased with suction time. The high water absorption rate at the start of the test has an appropriate capillary steepness coefficient in the same period. The relationship between the amount of water absorption Q per unit sample area and the capillary coefficient K is that when the amount of water absorption increases, the capillary coefficient and the rate of variation are both represented by the correlation coefficient R2. Moisture capacity is 6.9%. All laboratory tests are carried out by standard practice standards. The significance of this research is that innovative technology is adapted to modify and improve the construction industry process, thereby improving the environment that is sustainable, industrial waste management, and cheaper and more economical construction. When 30% of the coarse aggregate is exchanged, the density and absorption of water from the produced concrete is within the allowable range. Therefore, Polystyrene Sanded Concrete can be used for the manufacture of lightweight concrete that performs the required functions with this replacement level.

Keywords: Analysis, Properties, Water, absorption, polystyrene, sanded concrete


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 1-11 (Download PDF)

Creative Commons Licence
This work by European American Journals is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License