PFAS and International Water Law: Implications for the Prevention, Reduction, and Control of Pollution under Art. 21 of the 1997 UN Watercourses Convention

Abstract

Discovered in the 1930s, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a family of thousands of human-made chemicals that are attractive for many applications. The persistence of PFAS in the environment has led to PFAS to bioconcentrate, bioaccumulate, and biomagnify in human beings and the environment. Recent studies have determined potential and actual adverse impacts on human health and the environment as a result of such exposure to PFAS. Water is believed to be the main pathway by which PFAS is transferred and diffused into the environment and ultimately entering into contact with human beings. Where these waters are a watercourse and shared by more than one State, there exists an international watercourse and international obligations. This article explores the implications of pollution from PFAS in the use of international watercourses under Art. 21 of the 1997 UN Watercourses Convention.

Citation: Andrew V. Vangh  (2022) PFAS and International Water Law: Implications for the Prevention, Reduction, and Control of Pollution under Art. 21 of the 1997 UN Watercourses Convention, Global Journal of Politics and Law Research, Vol.10, No.7, pp.13-22

Keywords: Environment, International, PFAS, watercourses

DOI: https://doi.org/10.37745/gjplr.2013/vol10n71322

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 13-22 (Download PDF)

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