The diffusion of the Western model of democracy to sub-Saharan (French-speaking) religious organizations and the theoretical partitions between actors in international relations

Abstract

This article analyses the types of relationship that sub-Saharan religious organizations have with the Western model of democracy. Indeed, the end of the Cold War has been presented as translating in international relations the global consensus around liberal democracy. However, the worldwide diffusion of liberal democracy has produced contrasting effects in so-called religious organizations. While in church organizations with a Judeo-Christian tradition, democratic mimicry predominates under the benefit of original processes of local reinterpretation, on the contrary, it has prompted a reaction of protest against the unique model of democracy in Islamic organizations. By subscribing to the theories of transnationalism and interdependence, the objective of this article is to demonstrate that there is a homology of rationalities between states and religious organizations in relation to the Western model of democracy. This homology of rationalities reveals that the international circulation of democratic values ​​does not adapt to the theoretical divisions established between the actors of international relations.

Citation: Assana (2021) The diffusion of the Western model of democracy to sub-Saharan (French-speaking) religious organizations and the theoretical partitions between actors in international relations, Global Journal of Political Science and Administration, Vol.9, No.3, pp.42-69

Keywords: Democracy, Democratization, International Relations., Mimicry, religious organizations, states, sub-Saharan Africa, westernization of the world in question

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 42-69 (Download PDF)

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