HUMAN RESOURCE POLICY AND JOB SATISFACTION OF EMPLOYEES IN KNOWLEDGE-BASED ENTERPRISES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE INDIGENOUS AND EXPATRIATE TEACHING STAFFS OF KAMPALA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY, UGANDA

Abstract

This paper describes the differences in human resource policies and job satisfaction among the indigenous and expatriate staffs of Kampala International University (KIU). The researcher employed a case study and causal comparative research design in which self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from a sample of 138 respondents. Data was analysed using the statistical package for social scientist (SPSS), and in particular, using means and the independent t-test. The study revealed a low variation in human resource policies of (r2 value 14% and Sig. 0.032) between the indigenous and expatriate academic staffs of KIU. However, a significant differences in job satisfaction was reported (r2 value 62% and Sig. 0.017) among the two groups which in favour of the expatriate teaching staff. The researchers attributed this to variation in the reward policy, thereby concluding that, although the HR policies at KIU a slightly different among the indigenous and expatriate teaching staff, job satisfaction is significant different, which attributed to differences in the reward policies of the university. This study therefore, recommends that the university management streamlines the rewards policy to create a sense of equity and fairness amongst its teaching staffs. This will increase job satisfaction among the indigenous teaching staffs, which will consequently increase productivity in the university as whole.

Keywords: Human Resource Policies, Job Satisfaction, Promotional Policy, Reward Policy, Training and Development Policy


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 13-27 (Download PDF)

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