PHILOSOPHICAL PERCEPTIONS OF SUICIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SANCTITY OF LIFE

Abstract

The sanctity of human life is commonly adjudged as placing great moral burden on man. On this premise, some philosophers opined that man has no right to terminate his life. While others argued that having received life as a gift, man has the right to reject the gift when he perceives that there is no value in remaining alive. This could be due to grave illness or other forms of dissatisfaction. There are various arguments presented both in favour and against suicide by these proponents. Notable among the protagonists are some philosophers. The study therefore, seeks to examine the philosophical perceptions of suicide and implications on the sanctity of human life. The writer applied philosophical, sociological and historical research methodology in his investigation. It is recommended that man should not necessary see suicide as the right option for escaping the vicissitudes of life, which are often likely to confront man. On the other hand, it is a tremendous moral burden on man if he decides to terminate his life since he would be depriving those he could have supported, both financially and morally. The study also recommended that man should uphold the sanctity of life, as life is a gift from God. Man cannot give life and not justified to also take life, the study argued.

Keywords: Life, Perceptions, Philosophical, Sanctity, Suicide


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 47-62 (Download PDF)

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