Science Fiction on Stage: Dystopia in Caryl Churchill’s Far Away

Abstract

Most people do not think of drama as science fiction and fantasy, and although science fiction does not really exist as a genre in theatre in the same way it does in the world of fiction or cinema, theatre – from its first existence – has lent itself to fantasy. The British playwright, Caryl Churchill (1938-    ) in one of the most innovative dramatists; she has written a great number of plays that have been associated with feminist, surrealist and postmodern theatre. She is known for her social, ecological, political and moral commitment, and her drama is widely recognized for surrealist experimentation, exploration of language and abandoning realist approaches. Far Away (2000) is a dystopian vision of a world turned against itself, where there is an on-going war of all against all. The play is mysterious and powerful with an extraordinary element of darkness, posing an intriguing question: how far away we are from this world of paranoia, hatred and loss. The audience is engaged in a search for answers and significance of this dramatic experience.

Keywords: Caryl Churchill, dramaturgy, dystopia, science fiction

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 33-39 (Download PDF)

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