Does Alcohol Culture Affect Risk Propensity and Performance impairment of Workers? Evidence from a Cameroonian Sample

Abstract

Workplace alcoholism has been perceived as a workplace hazard and poses a great threat to organisations as health, safety and performance risks. In order to ensure effective management and control problematic alcohol thinking and behaviours, interest has been on factors that determine alcoholism. Although individual psychological factors have been identified, socialization has often been held responsible for workplace alcoholism. The study examined prevalence of alcohol culture and relationships with risk propensity and performance impairment. The study used data collected from a survey with a sample of teachers in Dschang Municipality in West Cameroon. The instrument used to collect the data was designed by the researcher, and tested for reliability (aggregate α=.77). The study revealed a significant positive correlation between societal drinking culture with risk propensity (p< .01) and performance impairment (p< .01). The study further reported insignificant relationships between workplace alcohol culture with risk propensity (p>0.05) and performance impairment (p>0.05). The study appears necessary and relevant given the increased interest for drinking and consequences in social and work life. While policy and practice implications have been discussed, there are new directions for future research.

Keywords: Alcohol culture, Health and Safety, performance impairment, risk propensity


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 61-76 (Download PDF)

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