Assessment of Mass media utilization preference in birth control campaign among health care providers in Delta State, Nigeria.

Abstract

This study examined the most preferred and effective mass media channel that health workers often use to campaign for birth control practice in Delta State of Nigeria. To accomplish this, a structured questionnaire was used to answer three research questions that bother on the most preferred, effective, as well as the factors that affect the preferred channel, used for the campaign of birth control. Though all media channel, including the traditional and social media platform was found to be useful and effective, the television, with an outstanding score of 37 percent, followed by the radio that had 25 percent, was found to be more preferred, and effective. Though the radio, with a score of 40 percent, was found to be the most cost effective channel, health workers in the state observe that the television is more accessible and commendable in the campaign for birth control in the State. Despite the effectiveness of the television, results show that the educational level, sociocultural and religious practice of Deltans, were found to impinge on the practice of media campaign for birth control. The study therefore conclude that a robust budget should be made available for the continuous running of mass media campaign, especially the television, for birth control. Furthermore, mass media experts are advised to design media messages that will eradicate the misconceptions, sociocultural, as well as the religious components often associated with mass media campaign for birth control.

Citation: Queenett Irori , Harvey G.O.Igben  and  Joyce Oqwezi, (2022)  Assessment of Mass media utilization preference in birth control campaign among health care providers in Delta State, Nigeria, British Journal of Psychology Research, Vol.10, No.2, pp., 1-22,

Keywords: Birth control, Health Care Providers, mass media campaign, sociocultural and religious factor

Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 1-22 (Download PDF)

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