HOLLYWOOD IMPERIALISM ON CALABAR-SOUTH TEENAGERS- THE SCORE SHEET

Abstract

The onus of this thesis hung on ascertaining Hollywood imperialism on the behavioral pattern of teenagers in Calabar-South Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. A multicultural milieu atomized as Efik, Efut and Ejagham clans. Pigeon English and Efik are their diglossia. An area intimately stigmatized by an obnoxious phobia. This study was between June 2013 and November, 2013; and it uncovered the root causes of these attritions. Here, the Social Cognitive Theory, created a paradigm shift from a humble African belief to the polemics of Hollywood imperialism, experimented on 200 teenagers of age bracket 12 to 25 years as sample male and female. A survey method questionnaire titled ‘Individual Experience Questionnaire’ (IEQ) was used for data collection. Using statistics, it was revealed that: (i) 55.8% acculturated Hollywood movies influenced teenagers’ aggressive behaviour. It unveiled the presence of different secret cults, emanating from popular Western cultures. Within this precinct, these cult groups meted mayhems: prostitution, child abandonment and other nefarious threats, mostly perpetrated by primary and secondary schools’ dropouts, broken homes and poor parental care as authenticated by personal interviews. (ii) 97.5% posited that Hollywood movies do not depict Nigerian trado-cultural hegemony; thus leading to a shift from indigenous to alienists’ culture instead of mummifying the unique ‘Africanism.’ While concluding that Hollywood imperialism has caused a shift in youth behavioral paradigm in Calabar-South, it was recommended amongst others that Government (through FVCB) should enhance a curtail of Hollywood  film shows while adopting/encouraging philanthropic youth based projects such as the Obioma Liyel Imoke’s Destiny Child Centre and Mothers Against Child Abandonment.

Keywords: Calabar-South, Hollywood, Imperialism, Pro-social behaviour, Score sheet, Teenagers


Article Review Status: Published

Pages: 11-25 (Download PDF)

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